Building Quality into Garments (1984)

Building Quality into Garments (1984)


in the manufacturing of apparel quality
begins with the designers concept of the garment and is incorporated in all
stages of production every manufacturer must establish the level of quality
needed in order to satisfy the target market quality is directly related to the value
of the raw materials production costs standards and skills it must be built in
throughout the manufacturing process it cannot be achieved during the final
inspection quality control is the process of maintaining standards and
allowable tolerances for a specific quality level it must be an ongoing
process that takes place in each stage of production a good quality control
program will help eliminate factors that may increase production costs as waste
rejects and difficulties and production on the other hand quality control
measures also require extra time and procedures that create additional costs
it is important to set standards that are reasonable and reflect the level of
quality that the target customer will accept the following examples show the
production standards used in the making of a high-quality garment flat smooth seams with perfectly matched
plaids are an important quality standard matching stripes and plaids requires
special attention and care during spreading cutting and sewing the
procedures are slower require more operator skill and thus increased costs
each step depends on the previous one being done correctly this operator
manipulates the fabric and monitors the match through the length of the seam
each seam is inspected by the operator as it is finished this company requires
that fabric design must match exactly pleats in a quality garment are
precision cut and sewn the type depth and number will vary with the design of
the garment regardless of the design correct grain must be maintained exact
placement of each pleat has been previously marked the accurate pleat
width is assured by placing the fabric over a guide before it is stitched
notice the care with which the operator matches the markings and secures each
pleat stitching across the pleats at the seam line prevents distortion when the
waistband is set this is an extra step to ensure proper hang of the pleats seemed busting is used with open seam
construction to produce a flat smooth appearance pressing during production is
an integral part of quality garments pressing at this stage requires
additional handling and more equipment but achieves a result that is impossible
with only a final pressing lining adds esthetics comfort and
durability when cut and sewn with precision a fully lined garment
represents a higher quality level durability of a lining is related to the
fiber content fabric construction and application a lining must be carefully
applied to avoid distortion of the outer garment notice the care and precision
with which the operator is applying the lining to the skirt vent she measures to
make sure the sides of the slit are the same length and the fabric design
matches she ensures this position with a small clip at the fold of the him the lining is positioned by matching at
the top of the vent and the him extra time is involved to ensure accurate
placement the vent is stitched in two steps to create a sharp flat upper end
to the slit this is much more time consuming than a continuous seam the triangular fold made at the lower
corners of the lining helps prevent traveling and concealed raw edges the vent is completed with edge
stitching notice how the operator rolls the seams to the inside to hold the
lining in place here again we see the operator
inspecting her own work to ensure it meets quality standards neat accurate top stitching as a highly
visible indication of quality good quality top stitching is related to
operator skill and machine adjustment this is obviously a very skilled and
efficient operator notice how she manipulates the enclosed seam allowance
and rolls the seam to the inside for a sharp accurate edge although she works
rapidly she does not sacrifice accuracy a well-set sleeve has adequate ease
evenly distributed the operator achieves this by using numerous match points and
careful manipulation of the fabric other ways the quality is built into this
operation include attaching the lining in a separate operation to prevent
shifting matching bundle numbers to avoid color shading and taking
precautions to keep garment seams open and flat as the sleeve is set capping
the sleeve shrinks out fullness notice the amount of time spent to ensure a
smooth neat hang to the sleeve from the inside the sleeve is steamed around the
entire arm sigh this is called capping this process sets the seam and creates a
smooth rounded cap line this operation involves a lot of time handling and
special equipment but is necessary for a proper drape to the sleeve accuracy of button placement is
important to the fit and hang of the finished garment in this process the
operator carefully positions the waistband in order to chalk mark the
correct placement for the button in relation to the buttonhole no tolerance
is allowed in matching buttons to buttonholes in this particular plant
accuracy is achieved by spending the additional time required to precisely
mark the button position this inspector uses a template for accurate and uniform
button placement on the sleeves and aligns the jacket fronts before
chalk marking through each buttonhole inspectors carefully monitor the quality
throughout the construction process operators inspect their own work as well
as that of the previous operator if defects are found corrections are made
by the operator before the garment is advanced along the production line the
final inspection is the last checkpoint before the garment leaves the plant
inspectors look for flaws in construction color shading and fabric
matching loose threads are carefully removed and garments are examined inside
and out notice the amount of time invested in this Quality Assurance
procedure from the design board to final inspection maintaining quality is an
ongoing part of the production of a garment the examples you’ve seen
represent only a small part of the overall process at this plant quality
control and satisfying the customer is a major concern you

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