Chinese forced prison labor poses risk to garment supply chains

Chinese forced prison labor poses risk to garment supply chains


This week’s top stories include Chinese
forced prison labor poses risk to garment supply chains, Johnson & Johnson
concealed a dangerous quality control problem with talc products and Chinese
government drops Made in China 2025 for trade truce. Remember to click the
link below for the full stories. First up, Chinese forced prison labor
poses risk to garment supply chains. New evidence suggests Uighur detainees in
China are being forced to take jobs in factories. Satellite images, leaked
official documents and accounts show factories built in or near internment
camps. And Chinese propaganda shows detainees working in factories. U.S. brand
Badger Sportswear came under fire for potentially sourcing from the camps.
Retailers should remain cautious when manufacturing in the Xinjiang region.
Next up, Johnson & Johnson concealed dangerous quality control problem with
talc products. Worker documents reveal the company may have knowingly used the
asbestos contaminated talc in its baby powder.
The FDA doesn’t regulate asbestos in talc. But early this year it will
begin exploring a standard for evaluating potential health risks amid
growing consumer concern. Last up, Chinese government drops Made in China 2025
for trade truce. The Chinese government’s latest directive doesn’t require local
governments to make progress on the strategy. Previous guidelines included
financial support and recognition for supporting the initiative.
U.S. officials strongly oppose the scheme. And Beijing easing back on the
initiative could signify a positive progression in ongoing trade talks.
That’s all for now. Thanks for watching and tune in next week on Best in
Manufacturing! you

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *