Dress to Communicate

Dress to Communicate


[MUSIC] I love Leonardo DiCaprio. I saw him for
the first time in the movie, Titanic. He was just so cute and attractive, and I’m pretty sure I am not the only
one who felt in that way.>>[LAUGH]
>>When I watch the Inception and The Great Gatsby, my God,
I fell in love with him again. So, you probably understand how shocked
I was when I saw these photos on Google.>>[LAUGH]
>>It’s really hard to believe that they are the same person.>>[LAUGH]
>>So, what makes difference? There is a topic were we introduced today. Clothing. Clothing matters,
clothing is worth your 1,000 words. It is a very effected number of
communication tool, for two reasons. First it affects how other people
perceive you and behave towards you. There are a lot of research to prove this. For example, if you wear a suit, and then cross the street
against the traffic light. 3.5 times as many people will follow
you as when just wear work shirt or trousers or in trousers. [LAUGH] Also during negotiations people in a suit are more likely to have a profit
over deals than people in sweatshirts. And secondly more importantly it
affects how you think of yourself. Your self confidence. We just look at our power pose. In this power pose it goes pro women or
it goes pro men. It helps us feel the power and confidence. And, in fact,
clothing can give you the same effect. It turn out that people in superhero
clothing are more confident mentally and physically. So finding your own superhero
clothing that fits you well and also makes you feel very confident. So in sum Look Good, Feel Good,
Do Good, and Present Well. How are we going to do this? With that AIM framework Audience,
Intent and Message. And [INAUDIBLE] is how you can connect
with the audience through your clothing.>>Thanks Sienna. Before I start when was the last
time you walked into a room and the first thing on your mind is gosh
I wish I wore something different.>>[LAUGH]
>>I think it’s a very painful experience for those who have
experienced this before. And let me offer you three advice or
three questions we can ask ourselves, the audience and
avoid this from happening again. The first question we ask ourselves,
Who are they? And What do they wear? To get our thinking lets
me refer you to a book by a leading image consultant,
Sylvie di Giusto. Titled the Image of Leadership. In it she describes five simple
levels of a business wear. This takes out all the ambiguity about
you know what schedule smart casual, business formal. But what is important is that we can use this to apply to
our everyday business-wear. So it ranges from very formal ballroom
attire, like what I’m wearing right now. All the way to the Silicon Valley
baseline casual, similar to what Brandon is wearing. And in between we have the men’s
suit casual like Ryan and an executive casual like Hellen. And we, based on these five levels
we apply the +1, -1 free work. Holly works, so you identify
what your audience wears, okay? And then you wear one step higher,
more formal okay, so that you create that sense of presence and
the sense of executive confidence. And then one trick is to that
you should only step down. Dress less formal makes my next step. Only when they value
subsequently to a casual event. Second question to answer
is what do they expect? What do they expect you to wear,
specific to your industry, to your role? This is a tricky question because
often between specific professions. They’re all over and set and
unreturned norms for dress codes. But often the easiest way is to ask people
who work in those industries as well. And an easier way is to actually observe
what people wear around us every day. And the standard GSP is
a best place to live. Take for example, you have Eric Schmidt,
Raymond Nasr, and Peter Wendell all teaching the same class
are wearing different attires everyday.>>[LAUGH]
>>So, but, what really stands out for me is actually is Raymond Nasr
use of a bow tie, it makes him really stand
out from the crowd. But also Esther’s credibility
as a public relations expert. Thirdly, you shall
understand how they feel. The idea here is basically,
we should our attires with symbols that triggers
emotion in our audience. What I mean by that? Take for example, if you go for
an interview with the government. The best tip I could give to
you is to wear a flag pin. Instantly, your interviewers will see
you differently, they will like you. And the reason is because, they don’t
see a flag pin, what they see is this. With this, I’ll hand over to Ryan to
talk about how to communicate and send a message, [INAUDIBLE].>>In most situations,
simply meeting the norms and expectations of your
audience is not enough. You also need to consider what,
where it says about you as a person, as well as an organization. And you maybe represent it. If you dress in a way that
is not comfortable for you, you come across as inauthentic and
create cynicism. This is a picture of me when I was
working at a start up this summer.>>[LAUGH]
>>And made an effort to try and down play the fact that I was an MBA.>>[LAUGH]
>>For better or for worse. What you wear says a lot about
who you are as a person. There’s the obvious,
straightforward stuff. You want to look well put together and prepared and wear something that makes you
feel confident as well as comfortable. There’s also a lot of trade offs
that go into these decisions. Consider when you first go to
work at a company next year and you’re giving your first presentation. Do you want to dress in a way that
establishes your authority or do you want to come across
as a more relatable peer? Are you someone who’s more laid back or
more buttoned up and formal? And do you want to represent kind
of the status cloth traditional culture of the organization or are you
someone who’s going to rock the boat and be more progressive? This becomes even more
challenging when you factor in the brand of a company that
you may be representing. So take for example if you work
at a Silicon Valley company and you’re meeting with investment
bankers in New York, do you put on just your freshest
hoodie and with a company logo on it? Or do you go out and buy a pair of cufflinks in an effort to
kind of fit in with the expectations? You can do what Zuckerberg did and
try and compromise but the reality is that oftentimes these
two aspects don’t overlap completely. And at times they may be in
direct conflict with each other. The first thing you need to do,
at a minimum, is understand what it is the brand of the company organization or
cause that you’re representing is. And then you want to make a conscious
decision deciding whether you want your message, the message your appearance
sends, to align with that or contrast it. At times, emphasizing an aspect
of your brand can be beneficial, such as Vice’s Shane Smith. Emphasizing the fact that Vice is an edgy,
kind of next generation news organization. Sheryl Sandberg kind of takes
a different approach and gives an air of professionalism
that Facebook culture is typically not know for, and it’s kind of a way to
say that there’s an adult in the room. This can sometimes backfire,
in situations that I’ve seen, if you’re working at a very traditional
company and come across, you try and impersonate Steve Jobs. That can question the authenticity or if you’re working at cutting edge
company working on quantum computing and you dress more like a salesman that may
question how credible an organization is. So how do you meet these challenges? Just like you would in preparing
the content for your presentation. You want to make an explicit decision
about what message you want to communicate. You want to dress within ten and make sure that everything that
you wear aligns with that. Visual elements of a presentation
are often most memorable and leave a lasting impression. So at the very least you don’t
want to leave this up for misinterpretation or ambiguity. If you can be consistent with a company
brand that you represent, that’s great. If you want,
you can also contrast the message but either way, make sure you do so
deliberately. With these principles, Brandon will now talk a little bit
more about how to do this in practice.>>Great, thank you. So I’m going to give
you a few key tips for successful execution of dressing for
communication. The first step, Plan ahead of time. Now when you plan ahead of time,
that doesn’t just mean knowing what your super hero costume is,
that’s important, that’s great. But it’s also looking in your closet,
making sure it’s there, it’s picking it out, it’s ironing it’s
doing all the prep work you need to do. Who here has moved recently,
in the last 18 months? Everybody in the room probably,
or most people. I’ve moved four times
in the last 18 months.>>[LAUGH]
>>Last year when I was interviewing for the first time,
I knew exactly what I wanted to wear. I knew it down to the wire,
down to the sweater, but guess what? It wasn’t there. I didn’t actually go to the closet,
pick it out, look at it, iron it, do all the things
I was supposed to have done. And guess what? That affected me during the interview. Missing that key piece of clothing,
missing that sweater, changed the interview from being great. To the interviewer of Apple ask me
why I was wearing a suit jacket. It affects. Second thing think about travel. This isn’t just a former consultant
telling you to pack your bag a week ahead of time because your
about to get off a plane. This is think about
every aspect of travel. How are you getting from your house
to the place where you’re presenting? Are you biking, are you using the subway,
are you flying? These all indicates way that which you may
think about how you need to get yourself there, what you should wear
when you get out of bed? Should you change that for location
versus the change to get your home? These are all considerations. Finally, let’s talk about [COUGH]
communicating as a team, thinking about how you want to work as a team, whether
it’s everybody’s wearing all black. Whether it’s you’re communicating
by having different styles and being contrasting. All these are key things
you need to think about because two things could
happen potentially. You could be at a completely
different level as your colleague. That might not be okay, or maybe you’re
all wearing the exact same thing. And while that’s, okay in the case of a wedding party, it
may not be the image you want to present. If you’re going to an interview,
or if you’re presenting as a team. So those are just a few of our key tips
but we also want to talk a little bit about what are breaking
the fashion rules really mean? This is Lady Gaga’s famous meat dress
that most of you will probably recognize. And you know the day after she wore this, why did people say this
is a fashion don’t? Breaking all the rules and as you think
about the rules that we have discussed today, knowing your audience,
knowing your message, knowing your intent. Dressing the way that makes you feel
confident, makes you feel good. Planning, executing and
thinking about every step of the process. I’d say she did pretty well. If you think about these steps, if you think about these tools
that we’ve discussed today. I think you might have this kind of
effect on your audience as well. [MUSIC]

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