Fly front (for jacket and coat) part 4

Fly front (for jacket and coat) part 4


After stitching the collar in the garment, we make this final finishing line on the right side of the garment. It can go near the buttonholes or a little further, or you can place it along the groove of this stitch. Place the hem of the right forepart to the line traced on the left forepart and align the edges of the garment at the neck and at the bottom. Now I will show you how to find the places for sewing buttons. If the garment is made of dark fabric, you need to use a finely sharpen soap or chalk to draw an unfinished three-lined cross at the very edge of the buttonhole and press the outline of this cross on the left forepart. But, since the fabric is light, any chalk or soap will be very difficult to see, therefore, we need to use a pencil. Insert a pin into each buttonhole at a distance of 3-4 mm from the edge of the buttonhole, turn the right forepart over, align the left forepart with the traced line, lift the edge of the hem and mark the location of each pinhead with the pencil. Now we can start sewing buttons. The upper outer button and lower buttons do not have to be the same. The lower buttons can be smaller in diameter and should be flat, and the upper button can be any, preferably larger in diameter than the other buttons, and more fancy. All of the buttons should be sewn with reinforced buttons. Thread the fabric from the front side in a cross pattern, hook the reinforced button (the reinforced button is a small flat button) with the needle, pull the needle back over to the right side and hook the main button with the needle. I’m sewing all of the buttons with shanks no matter if the buttons have their own shank or not. In the process of sewing, the button should be pulled up from the surface of the fabric in order to leave a place for winding the shank, and the reinforced button on the contrary should be pulled tightly to the fabric of the facing. The sewn button should be able to touch the fabric with its own edge, it should be flexible on the shank, but not hang loose. When winding the shank at first I pull the thread down, then gradually move it up until it’s parallel with the surface of the fabric, and then pull it up. That’s it, we have wound the shank. I move the thread down to the facing and pull it from under the small button to the side. I thread the needle under the reinforced button three times so that the needle passed through the threads. The tighter the needle goes through the stitches, the better. I wind the thread on my finger and tear it off. That way the sewn button would not come off until the end of the garment life circle. All other buttons are sewn in the same way. I’ve sewn the hidden buttons. Now I’m going to button the garment up and show you how the fly front looks from the side. This finishing line is stitched with silk threads in tone with the fabric with the widest stitch spacing possible. Most importantly, you shouldn’t cross the edge of the hem with the last stitch. This finishing line can be rounded or it can be hemstitched as a corner depending on your preferences.

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