GCSE Design and Technology Textiles: Feedback on June 2015 (Unit 2 – Exam) Pre-recorded Event

GCSE Design and Technology Textiles: Feedback on June 2015 (Unit 2 – Exam) Pre-recorded Event


Hello and welcome to this pre-recorded event
for GCSE Design and Technology Textiles: Feedback on the June 2015 Unit 2 (Exam).
To help you get the most out of this feedback, you may want to have the following documents
handy as we will refer to them during the session.
The 2015 exam paper. The 2015 mark scheme.
This slide indicates the aims and objectives of this presentation which I hope you find
both useful and interesting. Question 11aii asks for a straightforward
response to the use of the equipment shown. This candidate was successful as they were
able to describe the use, without repeating wording used in the question. The response
showed an acceptable level of knowledge and led to a mark being awarded.
This type of question at the beginning of the paper is generally very accessible; however
students must show independent knowledge and
be careful not to rely on the wording given
in the question to gain marks. A key message here for students would be to
avoid repeating the wording used in the question as the main marking feature of the response
as this does not show knowledge and will not gain marks.
This student describes the method by which the oven glove could be made safe; for example
explaining it has ‘layers of wadding’. They then expand on this for the second mark by
clarifying the need to protect the hand and ‘insulate’ for wearer from ‘heat’ using examples
of ‘hot utensils’. Wherever they can, students should include
examples of items to enhance answers, drawing on experiences from the world around them.
While this question 11biii was generally well answered, some students lost marks as they
omitted to use connectives to justify reasons that matched the initial point made.
Although this candidate displayed some knowledge of what would make the oven glove more suitable.
The answer lacks the technical information needed to make it a fully developed response.
This candidate scored 1 mark. This slide shows some examples of why students
did well. Students should be mindful of the command
word used in questions as these indicate the kinds of response expected.
This candidate was able to give a response which identified ‘what’ needed to be checked,
for example, ‘the lines’ and then ‘why’ that check was needed, for example, so that they
were ‘equally spaced apart’. This question required a complete control procedure in order
to show the correct knowledge. A statement, such as, ‘check lines’ would not give enough
information to know ‘what’ to check the lines for.
Question 11bii was well answered as many students were able to use the diagram to aid there
response, even when they had little knowledge of the formal name of the technique shown.
As such, students were still able to gain a mark for a correct quality control.
Question 12 is the design question, where students are asked to produce two separate
design solutions to the 8 point specification provided. Each response must be different
and no marks are awarded for features that are the same in both solutions.
This learner presented a well organised page with clear annotations, each slightly separated.
Other features of good examples were numbering to indicate which specification point was
being referenced and clarity of sketch. For ease of assessing I will be referring to the
specification points in number order as they appear in the question paper.
In this example all specification points were met appropriately enabling the student to
access the maximum 8 marks. Specification points as follows:
1. Waistband indicates coverage of body (large surface area).
2. Name in large text. 3. Wide shoulder straps do not dig in.
4. Knee length no tripping. 5. Made from oil cloth so can be wiped off.
6. Wide neck, easy to put on. 7. Embroidery technique.
8. Loop to hang from. The response shown on this slide gained five
marks. The three marks lost were because explanations
were absent or were non-specific for the following: Specification point 1, ‘covering below the
knee’ was duplicated as a response for specification point 4, not allowing the latter to be given.
Specification point 3, ‘satin material’ does not say why satin is comfortable leaving the
examiner to question the candidate’s knowledge. Specification point 5, ‘could be put in the
wash’ is too general a response for credit. While this question was generally well answered
some students failed to gain marks where responses were vague and unclear as to their suitability
in meeting the specification point. It is important that students provide adequate
reasons to justify statements when trying
to meet specification points.
This slide exemplifies some reasons why students did well on this question. Look at the example in this slide.
Using your mark scheme, decide what mark you think should be awarded, and why.
This is a point at which you can pause the video to carry out the activity if you wish.
6 marks were given to the first design idea. It lost 2 marks for not showing it covering
most of the body (specification point 1) and for using the same method to be comfortable
and safe (specification point 3). Improvement on this design idea could be to
have the design drawn on a body to show how long the sleeves or bodice were and by adding
a feature such as an elasticated waist to avoid duplication. The second idea scored 4 marks. Where points
2, 3, 5 and 7 were repeated. Some features were too similar for example laminate & a
waterproof finish could only be credited once. Clear detailed explanation of some specification
points were given as seen with specification 4 as it gives a specifically named component
with good reasoning and specification point 6. The latter point meant examiners did not
need to be concerned about an incorrect response of back fastenings as the learner gives added
detail of ‘poppers’ attached to ‘long ties’. However, Specification point 2 provides a
repeat of design idea 1; the name badge annotation is too similar to the logo without another
method of delivery, for example applique. This slide gives some reasons why students
did do well in this question. This slide shows some reasons why students
didn’t do well in this question. When answering question 14bii some students
demonstrated good levels of knowledge as they not only correctly named the machinery but
also what it could be used for. However, generally students did not produce
an abundance of correct answers when tested
on the machinery needed to produce knitted
fabrics. Although many students understand
the difference between One off, Batch and
Mass production the technical vocabulary needed
to name the equipment used in high speed and
volume production was rarely given.
Students would benefit from engaging in activities
outside of workroom practices. This could
be in the form of a factory visit or by wider
reading and watching video clips.
This would make a great research topic and
home learning task from which students would
have the opportunities to share knowledge
and understanding with others.
While question 14c was generally well answered
some students lost marks because they tried
to re-word the question and provide the answer
by implementing key words, such as ‘needle’,
in their response.
This response shows some knowledge as the
student uses the word fleece. However it is
up to the examiner’s judgement to decide whether
the student understands that fibres are used
in a random format. Unfortunately the response
then gives the information ‘not woven to make
a yarn’ which is confusing and is incorrect
for the direction that the answer should go
in.
This good example uses good technical language
and provides a clear point and is supported
by a further linked statement.
The candidate was awarded the full 2 marks.
This slide gives some reasons why students
didn’t do well.
In question 13a this student shows knowledge
of the characteristic of silk being able to
keep you ‘warm’ and the fact that it is ‘easy
to dry’ were credited. However, this was not
reinforced by an explanation of why the fibres
perform in that way. Unfortunately, due to
the similarity of the characteristics and
matching justification the learner was given
1 mark as they appear on the same bullet point
of the mark scheme.
This style of question typically allowed students
to gain access to at least 1 out of the 4
marks available and was often successful in
that regard. Many students were able to give
characteristics but much fewer were able to
link suitable justifications to the initial
characteristic given.
Matching properties or characteristics of
fibres to reasons or justification of why
they would be suitable in certain situations
is a valuable and fundamental part of the
textile course and is best approached through
familiarity and repetition.
On the face of this the question appears to
have been answered well by the candidate as
they pull out features such as the fibre being
‘warm’, can ‘be dyed well’ and a seemingly
good reason for the positive dyeing outcome,
to achieve rich colour. However, on closer
inspection the justification does not actually
give the reason ‘why’ it is able to hold dye
well but reiterates that it ‘can be dyed well’.
While this question was generally well answered
some students lost marks, as in this instance,
because the clearly incorrect response to
justifying warmth is not linked to the fibre
but to the need of keeping warm. Other unsuccessful
responses were linked to the styling of the
gown.
The candidate was awarded 2 marks.
Students should be conscious that their justifications
are often better when they use technical language
to substantiate their initial point. For example
looking at the high absorbency level of silk
would give a good reason as to why dye penetration
is so successful.
This candidate performed much better as they
used keywords such as ‘good lustre’, linked
with the good reasoning as to why this characteristic
exists, as the fibre is ‘continuous’ and ‘smooth’.
They also mention the ‘crease resistant’ characteristic
and justify this with the point that ‘creases
may disrupt’ the aesthetics.
Students should be encouraged to write in
positive terms when asked to give benefits
and suitability of fibres.
This answer is an improvement on the previous
two and gained 4 marks.
This slide shows examples of why students
didn’t do well.
Look at the response shown on this slide.
Using your mark scheme, decide what mark you
think should be awarded and why.
Once you’ve summarised the task, you may want
to pause at this point to carry out the activity.
This response achieved 4 marks for this question
as explained in the annotations.
Improvements to this piece of writing could
be to give more detail and direct the focus
of the response to the identified target audience
of the designer’s client and consumer giving
more examples regarding the types of testing,
customer satisfaction or what the ‘natural
setting’ entailed.
Reasons why students did do well in this question.
Reasons why students didn’t do well in this
question.
Common issues with the past paper and suggestions
for improvement.
If you would like to know more about examination
statistics, you may find these links of interest
to you.
GCSE English subjects and Maths are changing
first for first teaching in September 2015,
with first assessments in summer 2017.
GCEs for a range of subjects are changing
first for first teaching in September 2015,
with first assessments in summer 2017.
We have just published our specifications
on the Edexcel website. They have been published
early in draft form to enable teachers to
have early sight of our proposed approach.
We are also running a series of launch events
too. Our draft specs and SAMs as well as further
information about our launch events can be
found on Edexcel.com
We constantly look to improve the delivery
of our training and appreciate all delegate
feedback.
Delegates will soon receive an email directing
them to our online feedback form.
The form takes no more than a couple of minutes
to complete. Please ask them to take the time to let us know their thoughts by filling in
this short form.

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