Guide Coat Before Painting Your Car

Guide Coat Before Painting Your Car


Welcome back! I’m Mark Stovall with
Finish First Restoration. And I’m Mike Mangan. And we’re back here today. We’ve got some great news from our last video – we took the motor up to the machine shop, and what did they have to say Michael? Well, they disassembled the motor. They Magnafluxed the block. Everything
looks good. There’s a few parts that wasn’t all 100 percent, but we got
enough parts between the two motors to make one good one. Thats awesome! Now, in our last video, we put the cab on
so we could get measurements for the custom bed. We’re working on it, but I
noticed you took the cal off as well. What’s going on with it? Well, we took the cal off because there’s some
additional prep work that needed to be done, in between the two parts. There’s some rust in there. And it’s a lot easier to work that cal up
on a bench than it is to try to work around this frame. So, we went ahead and removed that, but other than that we’re ready to move on to the next step. Okay, well the next step of the 4P process is the Prime step and all the products are gonna be labeled in
blue so that they are easy to identify. We’ve got a couple test panels. How do we know when these panels are
flat, and you know that you have all the imperfections out of it? Well, when you’re doing this work, you’ve
gotta go by sight and feel. So, if you can’t feel it, hopefully you’ll
be able to see it. Generally, you’ll be able to see it when
you are priming. It’ll lay wet, so you can look down the
panel to find out if it’s straight or not. After that dries, there’s a guide coat that you
can use to help aid in finding small imperfections only. It’s not gonna
straighten out panels for you, but it’s gonna identify sand scratches that you may have missed. Pits. Chips. Anything that you may have missed in the
prep stage. Let’s do this. We’ve got this panel here. A little test panel. So,
let’s show the folks at home how to, how to use a guide coat. We can do that. We’re at the test panel. We’ve actually got a couple dents in here, but we wanted to show you how the guide coat works Michael show us how this works. First, you want to start by shaking the can up to
make sure it’s properly mixed. You are not trying to paint this, you are just trying to get a pepper coat, or dusting on there. We’re gonna stand back more
than we normally would, and we’re just looking for that dusting
on there. As soon as you start to see that black
start to kind of pop-up, then that’s going to be good
enough. So, that right there should be enough
coverage. Okay. While that’s drying up, I wanna
show you guys a couple other products that we’re going to use in the Prime stage. We’ve got a flexible
squeegee here. This is a block sander. We’re going to use
it and we’ve actually soaking some of our 400 paper. That’s
what we’re going to use on this. The reason why we soak it in water, it’s
gonna make this sandpaper a little bit more flexible, easier to use, wrap around the block. You can use the sandpaper wet or dry. We recommend using it wet at this stage because, it’s going to wash away some of the
particles. Its gonna give you more longevity out of
that sandpaper, so Michael go ahead and see what we got going here. It should be dry enough to go ahead and
sand. I usually wanna wait about a minute. Make sure that that’s cured up enough. You can use a bucket, or you can use a
spray bottle. I like to use the bucket of water, because I
can keep dunking the paper in there to make sure that that I’ve gotten all the debris off of
the paper. So what we’re gonna do is, we’re just
gonna show you some of the areas that we have got this dent. We’ll use it as a squeegee. Immediately those areas are popping
right up. So that’s a good way to help reveal some of the problem areas. Those weren’t visual before, but now they’re you can you can seem very well now. So what do we have to do that now? You’re gonna have to go back to the
Prep stage. You’re either gonna have to work those dents out by hammer and dolly, or you’re
gonna have to put body filler in there. Now that shows you how to reveal the dents, but the guide coat also shows you
how to do other imperfections. We’ve got another panel, we can show
you how that works. So here we are at the grille shell and
what we had was a lot of rust pitting in this. We’ve sealed it and primed it, but what
is translated through, is what looks like orange peel. So, it looks like the surface
have an orange. We can see that pretty clearly What
the guide coat is gonna do, it’s gonna help us in the sanding process to identify that
we have gotten all of that out. So I’m going to go ahead just run, just run a pass over that. Let that dry up for a few seconds. Again, I’m using 400 grit sandpaper to start with. If we were to spray this with a metallic
color, after we use the 400 and can identify
that we’ve got all of that out. See, as you can see in the surface it immediately
start identifying the high and low spots of what we call that orange peel. What we can do is, we just keep sanding until we see that we’ve gotten all that out. Once we’ve gotten that all out, we can spray it with the guide coat
again and then use the 600 for metallic colors cuz metallics don’t
like to see a heavy grit because what can happen is, the metallic flakes will actually lay in the sand scratches and cause it to identify
those sand scratches again in the metallic paint, like the guide coat will So as we can see, we’re getting
pretty close to getting all that, that orange peel out. We still have a few
spots and this is where it really helps aid that Because once we have gotten down to this spot, had we not used the guide coat it’d be very difficult to identify that So, once we get all that out, we’ll spray it again, we’ll go to 600, and then we’re good. Well, we’ve got a lot
of other parts to get through the prime process. So we will
see you guys next week Thanks for watching! If you’d like to see more, subscribe to our YouTube channel or follow our blog on gofinishfirst.com/diamond-tWell, they got it apart they checked – I got a friggin gnat in my eyeI was on a roll too. Right in my friggin eye.

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