Hear My Voice: Dy Begay discusses Germantown Textile

Hear My Voice: Dy Begay discusses Germantown Textile


yeah Shaya dyb games yeah put some
asunción touching airbrushes chain sanjak Naha dad such a shame a Chanel a
doctor cut us Angela I just introduced myself in the novel way and this is an
appropriate way to introduce oneself so you can find your relatives I’m very
partial to weddings especially the older Navajo rugs such as the Germantown
weaving like in this particular piece and I’m also interested in learning
about the history of the rug if there are any documentation available and I’m
interested in learning about the materials the Germantown yarns that dyes
I would love to take the waving apart and analyze and study the works the West
the joins in the design I think that would be very fascinating and this
particular Germantown rug is the most appealing for its age the use of the
color combination is stunning I was drawn to this particular weaving because
I especially like the bold color red the red is very striking and the pattern is
very attractive with clean diagonal lines the zigzag patterns on the
outsides are uniform and explicitly woven another word the zigzag lines are
perfect parallel lines the sides are exceedingly straight and
even which is hard to achieve and the colors and the patterns are laid out
with perfect symmetry and this I firmly believe was woven by a very skilled
weaver and the weaving is even it’s flat and truly an amazing piece of art when I
was looking at the photograph of the weaving the Germantown weaving I asked
myself and I agree that there is absolutely
science and math involved in the design and the materials use
I appreciate weaving on so many different levels examples I endure the
labor-intensive process of herding the sheep shearing the sheep with manual
Clippers washing and sorting the wool collecting the plants to make the colors
spinning the wool spinning the yarn dressing the loom and thinking up a
design to weave and I often wonder if a non-native knows how much is involved in
creating a beautiful rug I wonder if they know that this particular weaver of
this Germantown rug probably did not have a Western education or an art
degree but she is truly a genius and math and science because raising sheep
you know is a science you know to me raising sheep in the desert you have to
be able to know how to survive and know how to water your animals and I wonder
how does the Weaver figure all these out I had a lot of questions in my mind
one thing is I would love to ask the Weaver how they felt about trader
influence the use of commercially processed diagon and introducing
designer you know designs to copy I would love to know which community the
Weaver came from what her clients are or how many sheep she possess and did
anybody help her weave any family members help her weep was the process of
preparing the material hard and who else world and her family where where did she
sell her rugs which trading posts and in what other style or design she wove what
influenced her is she teach anyone else in her family to weed
how did she acquired her weaving tool did her family help her with the process
the general knowledge that I’ve acquired very recently about who is the weaver I
think for the most part you know it is generally known that da it’s the woman
that possess in a weaving or do most of the weaving but according to our
traditional stories both sexes are involved the male were the original
weavers which I learned very recently and the women came into the picture and
basically took up took up the weaving and today we are known to be you know
the weavers so it is accepted and is you know true that you know both sexes are
the weavers I believe that for many Native artists or Navajo Weaver’s their
environment their community and their culture plays a significant part in how
and why they create art the art could be any medium such as basket weaving silver
smithing or clay making but I think it’s an interesting style and that the role
of traders influence on traditional local weavers played a big part in
providing the weavers with pretty colorful yarn from Germantown
Pennsylvania and sometimes the designs were provided for the weavers to weave
in some ways I think this made the process easier since the weavers didn’t
need to share clean card or spin the wool and from personal experience I know
that you know performing all the process it’s a very labor-intensive
intensive process as a weaver produces everything by hand but indigenous art
comes from a place a place that we call community when I define indigenous
aesthetic it always reminds me that in our way the Navajo way we say that
weaving is life and this is a very strong sediment clearly links us as
people to our art of weeding as a special and sacred gift

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