How The Masked Singer’s costume designer dreams up the show’s insane outfits

How The Masked Singer’s costume designer dreams up the show’s insane outfits


(upbeat music) – There’s definitely a lot
of projects in the past in my career that have crossed over with the direction of this show being able to do big world tours being able to do halftime
shows at Super Bowl and constantly working with an
idea of elaborate art pieces elaborate costuming
drew my inspiration into being able to execute this show. With the Super Bowl and puppeteer work and building the sharks and
building the beach balls and the palm trees and
exploring that world of mobility it definitely served a great
purpose on how to build this show and what we can do different and what can I do that really, kind of balances the line between
costume design and mascot and I think that’s very
important for this show that we’re sticking to
the creativity of the actual fashion-forward
costuming process of it rather than, you know,
walk about costumes. There’s already great precedence,
you know, set on the show as to what this is all about and, you know you’re wearing masks,
you’re wearing costumes and the idea is a reveal,
but for us I wanted to bring something a little bit
more diverse, you know and play with different
characters, bringing animals bringing cartoons, bringing
kind of like a variety of a demographic that could relate to this and not be so serious about
building these costumes but more so just have fun
and explore the limitations of what can we do with masks. It’s my first time truly
working with 360 masks so, for me it was an
incredible experience working and collaborating with some
of the best fabricators to have this come to
life and my limitations kinda happen then as to
what we can and cannot do to make a sketch turn into
life or, you know, work of art. A lot of it was kind of
learning as we’re building these costumes, what
fabrics can I get away with what can we use, what’s
not overheating the costume what’s creating mobility, you know and a lot of it we just
kept learning through the short time of the builds. (suspensful music) – I’m so freaking confused right now. I don’t know who I am. – For season one we had to, of course not really having any
kind of specific platform as how to do this. It was pretty much our
challenging moment to figure out how to create the
costumes from the artwork and then from there it
was working with a talent that was choosing their own costumes or having to handpick
somewhat they wanted to do and how to customize all this and working with my fabricators
on every single process from the beginning to end doing a wired sample of the mask then building in all
the foam and the netting in order for us to get in oxygen airways and also have visibility. We got lucky if we had two fittings. So, in our first fitting
we really had to nail down all the issues and being
able to work with talent have an open communication
knowing that, you know this is kind of the trial run for us to get these going on stage and it was pretty incredible to have that working relationship where, you know we got really great feedback and we were able to correct
costumes moving forward at the same time, even
elevates some of the costumes when they wanted to be a
little bit more challenging on their masks and a little bit more restricting on their wardrobe. – [Host] Who’s behind the mask? – It makes you crazy. – The talent was casted for the show they were purposed with multiple ideas of what the artwork was already like. I did all the designs prior to the casting so that there were options to send out and then the talent kind
of gravitated towards one or two of the sketches and then we had phone call
as far as what direction I think would be best for them and being able to assist
as far as what message they want to portray or why
they wanted to be this character on the show and how can they
make it come to life even more. Here we have the peacock from season one. The mask is a 360 mask so
this is one of the first ones that we actually made. It is cut into two
different parts of a visual and a vocal so, underneath
the beak we were able to camouflage a netting as
specified for echo and projection and kind of vocal training
so, everything that you see projects the voices loud as pure mic then we were able to cut into screens and open hole for straight
on peripheral vision coming out of the beak. So that this is definitely
one of the most detailed intricate costumes. Here we have kind of my vintage
soldier, lost in the woods forest creature deer. The mask, the leathers,
everything was hand-painted and handcrafted and then
aged as well to kind of create this vintage, military
gas mask type of a character. We were able to completely
open up the bottom of the mask so that the full vocal
comes from underneath then create airways for
the nozzle of the mask and then also keep it as true
to the eyesight as we could. He has elements in the
costume that do light up and that kind of created the
more of an industrial effect to the costume so, this
was my balance between little bit of steampunk, little
bit of Civil War vintagey military aspect to it and
pretty much one of my favorite guys that gets overlooked. Here we have the monster who’s also the winner of season one one of the most different
costumes from the rest. This was one of the
challenging costumes for us to make it work, to create a human shape without an actual shape of a costume and also create a human toy. You know, people in general
are not used to wearing masks so when you’re in a full,
kind of, walkabout costume it’s being able to maneuver your balance and your movement and
your capability to perform so to be able to create
mobility in the arm movements and the leg movements, we
have to create kind of like this cylindrical creature
and then figure out the mouth opening being
right where the face sits and then also create a giant eye what gives us a full
visual and also airways. A lot of challenges with this guy but it actually turned
out pretty incredible. It’s great to have an imagination and it’s incredible for me
to put something on paper and be like this is what we’re making but in reality it’s like not
every costume could be made and not everything, you
know, could be found and we are on such a time
crunch that sometimes I have to even wheel myself
back in and be realistic. There’s something so
interesting about the show because it almost is a
new platform of liberation for lot of these artists. A costume in general
tells a beautiful story. It’s something that you
kind of let your imagination run wild with prior to anybody singing or, you know, speaking the first lines it sets the tone of any
scene or any performance and I think what’s kind of the
beautiful part about the show is you’re hidden, you’re
masked yet you’re letting your voice speak and kind
of represent who you are and it’s not being able to be judged by anything from the past or what you’ve done or your career or where you are in your life, you know it becomes kinda like this rebirth again of just being able to have fun on stage. I think that’s probably to
me the most beautiful thing to see how many people
truly come out of the show just saying that it
was the best experience of their lifetime, you know because it’s completely
shaped their own art. – [Panelist] Take it off! Take it off! T-Pain! T-Pain! – No way! – Are you kidding me? – Yeah, that’s what
I’m talking about baby.

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