How to Spec Your Garment with Points of Measure!

How to Spec Your Garment with Points of Measure!



hey guys and welcome back to DIY technical design we're in Section five now where we're going to be talking all about points of measure how to create your graded spec and how to create your very own how to measure guide so let's remind ourselves what RP om pages our PLM page is a list of all of our points of measure and these are going to delineate where we're taking our measurements on our garment in order for our production facility or our factory to be able to make our garment also listed on your PM page as your tolerance in your grade you'll also be creating PM codes for each of your points of measure so that it has a unique identifier the reason that you want to create a unique PM code which in my case I've just used numbers but you could use letters or really anything you want to the reason that it's so important is it's a great way to stay organized it's a great way to just be able to quickly add your points of measure into your graded spec page and in addition it's a great way to reference specific PM codes for example in your review comments in a way that's much more shorthand than writing out the entire points of measure in your comments so you might be wondering what the heck is tolerance tolerance is the amount above or below your spec that you're willing to accept a sample your production tolerance and your sampling tolerance might be different usually you are sampling a tolerance is a little bit more strict while your production tolerance is a little bit more lenient for example if you had your sleeve length tolerance as half an inch then if your sleeve length came in when it was sampled from your factory as half an inch over or more three-quarters of an inch over then you could reject the sample and the factory to make another one essentially your tolerance is the amount above or below your spec that you're willing to accept your sample as in all other cases you will either reject the sample or ask the factory to go back to spec for the next sample if you'd like to know how I set up my P om page and migrated spec page you can check out section 1 of DIY technical design where I go over how I set up each page in the tech pack here's my formula for writing P om s start with a coding system I like to use numbers enter your P om number and then the name of the P om you could also specify if it's a full measure or a half measure for me I only specify half measures so that my factory knows the rest of my PMS are always going to be a full measure the P om will be written now as follows measure the type of measurement whether its width length height or something else from your starting location to your stoping location and at the location that it's at here's an example my P om code is number zero zero for my P om measurement is waist width and it's going to be a half measure I always like to bold this information so that it's easier to see the P om then reads measure width from side to side at waist so now that you've created your list of PM's based on the formula that I talked about in this section you can start adding that to your tech pack this template that you're seeing right now is the one that I go over in Section one of DIY technical design and it's also the same template that I sell on my website so if you've already purchased this template then the formatting will be the exact same as this so regardless of what your formatting is for your specific p.m. list what you're going to want to do is copy and paste all of your PM's into this format and so I am just going to show you a couple of them you'll add at your tolerance and then you'll also add the grade for your specific garments so it's just clear all this out and let's just say that my grade is like half an inch and it'll be specific to your style and your brand which I also talked about earlier on in this series I talked about grading and sizing so if you want to check that out you can you know I'm just gonna copy and paste this since they are the same type of measurement they'll have the same grade and the same tolerance and so now that you have this all of your PM's in here you can just go directly to your graded spec and you can put those PM's in here and if you've used the vlookup function that I talked about in section one then it'll automatically pull all of that information from your P om list and it'll put it into your graded spec so let's try it out whoops and you can see that here so it looks like the UM the font size is a little big so you can just adjust that so that you can see everything and move it over here however you want your formatting is totally fine and then you know this is a men's style let's say our length is 30 inches at the back and 33 at the front and that will automatically calculate your based on your grade and the rest of your measurements if you've used the vlookup function that I talked about in section one we won't be going over how to create your specific garment specs in this series but if you're wondering how to do so you can take a retail sample and measure it using these specs as a baseline you can then determine what the spec should be for your specific garment I plan to go over this in a future series but hopefully this quick method will work for now so this is a really easy way to set up your your graded spec page with all of the PM's that are specific to this garment for example you might have a hundred different PMS but you may only need to use twenty of them for this t-shirt style and so you would only put those PM's into this P OM spot on your graded spec but you can let the rest of your p.m. still live on this page in case you need to reference them later you don't need to delete them or anything so this kind of acts as your library in your template and then when you send it out to your factory you can just hide this tab if you don't want them to see this information or be confused by it I definitely recommend to hide it just so they're not looking at this and being confused by it in any way and that way they're only seeing what's on your graded spec some good practices and strategies for using your POS in your tack pack is to never box in your factory when using your PMS only give them as much information is necessary to create the garment you don't want to give them a measurement for every single point on the garment because that doesn't allow them any wiggle room to create specific pattern shapes you really just want to give them the basic so that they're able to create the garment and then they're able to be creative in the ways that they need to in order to create the pattern as always don't duplicate information in the tech pack and make sure that your poems aren't overlapping just like I said before you don't want a box in your factory but you also don't want to duplicate information that confuses your factory when they're trying to create the pattern for your garment you'll also want to put your POS in a particular order that makes sense to you for example the P om list that I have available on my website has the basic measurements first for tops then specific detailed measurements for tops than the basic measurements for pants the detailed measurements for pants after that and then some other detailed specific PMS for dresses and different styles of Governments using this method makes it a little bit easier when you're going through and trying to side what PM's you need to use in a specific style tech pack and makes it just a little bit easier for you to decipher which ones need to go in and which ones you don't need you also may need to add or adjust your P om to fit a specific style I like to create my PMS as a little bit more generic in some instances like for pockets for example so then for specific styles I can go back in and change the PM to say exactly where that pocket is gonna be if it's gonna be on the chest if it's on a pair of pants that way it's just a little bit easier to not have so many POS in your library and you're able to just adjust the ones that are the beasts p.m. that you have just slightly so that it fits your specific style so let's get into what how to measure guide is and how to use it so now that you've created your PLM list you'll be able to create a how to measure guide based off of that list what you're gonna do is essentially just create a packet of either images or sketches that show visually where to measure the garment based on your PMS so your P om list and your how to measure guide will correspond exactly and that's another reason that having your PLM codes is so important because you can just list those in both places and so it's very easy to find the information both visually and written your how to measure guide acts as the standard for how to measure your garment there's many different ways to measure just one specific point on a garment whether it's to the seam to the stitching just across the garment from edge to edge there's so many different ways that you can interpret how to measure a garment so this is essential for sharing with your factory so that you both are understanding the specs correctly and when reviewing samples they understand where you're measuring to and what it's compared against in order to create your how to measure guide you'll want to set up a template in either illustrator or whatever program you're using to create it so that all of your pages look consistent and so that you can get the most information onto each page without overcrowding so this is the format that we are going to create so what I'm going to do is I'm going to head over and add another artboard so I can show you how I made this and I'm just going to create a large square and then I'm going to add a few lines so that I have a header space and then three rows and two columns all right that looks good then we can add our header and you can use whatever font or formatting you'd like you can title it with your company name you could add your company name at the bottom whatever you prefer I'm just going to make sure that's centered and then I like to also add the date or the year in case you are updating this over time so I'm going to add that this was created in 2019 and then I'm also going to add the page number so in case um you know I print it out and I don't staple it or something like that then I know what page order it's in because your p.m. should be in a order that makes sense to you for example I have tops first then pants and then special style gillum's all right so now that you have your format set up you can adjust it however you'd like if you'd like to add color if you'd like to change the line widths or anything like that you can go ahead and do that what I'm going to do is show you how to add a single PLM and then you can use that format going forward for the rest of the PM's that you create for your how to manage your guide so I'm taking a P om from my P om list that I've already created and you can create your own just as a basic list or in an excel file in a Word document however you want to do that using the formula that I already mentioned in this tutorial and I'm just going to copy and paste it into this top section and I like to always include the p om code which you can see here and I always like to bold what the actual p om name is it just makes it a little bit easier to see so you can see an example of kind of where I'm going with this here and what I'm going to do is I'm going to take a sketch I've already created if you need help creating sketches then you can check out my full tutorial on how to create technical sketches that's on my blog and I also have it on YouTube as well and I'm going to copy it over here just a basic t-shirt sketch so that I can show how to measure the body length at front and you're going to you can either for the example on this body length at back p.m. I didn't add any dotted lines but I do like to add the dotted lines for high point shoulder or if it's kind of hard to see where exactly you're measuring to and then I'm also going to add one at the bottom hem especially because this is a curved bottom hem you want to make sure that you're being specific about where they are measuring to where your factories measuring to or where you rushing to and then I'm also going to add a arrow and the arrow is representing where the measurement is taking up place and of course you can use any sort of formatting you'd like for your arrows if you don't know where the arrows are they just live inside of your line or your stroke window and then the arrowhead options are right here there's a bunch of different types you can use so if you are not wanting to sketch you could also use a photo this is just a photo that I took really quickly Alang just a sample that I laid down and put a tape measure over the top and so this is another way of creating that same view on the same p.m. and putting it in a way that's a visual representation but maybe is a little bit easier if you're not super skilled as a draw and drawing or an illustrator you could also create something like this in InDesign in Word there's tons of different options you could even hand draw if you really wanted to really the point is just to illustrate each of your PM's so that your factory understands how to measure your garments and so that you have also established a standard for your brain all right you guys that does it for section 5 of DIY technical design we're halfway through this series and I hope it's been super helpful of course if you have any questions please reach out to me you can view the other videos so far for the series in the playlist on youtube or on my blog everything's linked below please like subscribe comment and share thank you so much and I'll see you guys next week

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