Husqvarna Viking Designer Ruby 62 How to Hoop the Fabric

Husqvarna Viking Designer Ruby 62 How to Hoop the Fabric


Hooping the fabric can be one of those things
you just have to practice. I’m going to show you some tricks that I use when hooping my
fabric up. First off, if you are actually working with a piece that you need to get
perfectly centered in your hoop or at least have a center point for where the design is
going to be, start off by taking a ruler and putting a perfectly perpendicular line. If
this was my center right here then I can go ahead and go across like that. Now this is a purple vanishing marker so if
I don’t do my embroidery right away these lines are going to disappear, but what I can
do is go ahead and use this and get it lined up with the mark of my hoop so I know I actually
get it in there straight. Now remember this machine, the Husqvarna Viking Designer Ruby
Royale has the ability to hoop crooked. So even if I’m not perfectly straight I can just
go ahead and hoop it and not worry about it. Yay, but sometimes it’s nice to get it in
there at least halfway where you want it to be. Now, before I actually hoop I already have
cut out two pieces of stabilizer. Yes, I do use two layers of stabilizer for every project
I do, if not more. I also use some spray adhesive. I’m going to spray the layers of stabilizer
together and then go ahead and use … This is actually Mettler’s Web Bond. I like it
because as I spray I don’t get over spray on my machine or my cabinet if I’m really
careful. Some of those other sprays get a little crazy and you definitely have to clean
things a little later, but I do like … It has almost like a … It reminds me of Spiderman.
You know how he has this little web that he shoots out of his fingers, and it’s more direct,
and that is what this is all about. By spraying the layers together, did you notice
I sprayed the stabilizer? That way when I go my spray adhesive doesn’t come off over
on my fabric. I’m going to give this a little bit more spray. There we go. Then it’s like
a big Post-it-Note. You can definitely just get it to attach and adhere right where you
want it to be, and then notice as I pull across the fabric, even on my bias it doesn’t stretch.
It makes it a lot easier to actually hoop up. Now notice when you look at your hoop you
have a line here and here, little marks. Those are going to be your center mark, and then
here and here. You also want to be able to read the 360 by 200. Always have that closest
to your body. If I was going to hoop, so that’s fairly equal here, we can go ahead and do
that. Notice I have the inner hoop on top of my fabric, and then what I’m going to do
is just go ahead and bring my outer hoop … This is why you need lots of room to hoop, and
you also want to hoop standing up. It’s a lot easier. Don’t do it on your lap. You need
a flat surface. What I’m going to do is just lift this up,
and before I do anything I’m going to make sure that this hoop is, the release has been
opened and the screw has been loosened. Then that way when I go to put this in it almost
just eases right into the outer hoop. Now what I’m going to do is get that top part
pushed in first. I’m going to come up here, slide that to the top. Coming off the edge
of my table I’m going to just pull open, and I can feel because of how easy it is, it just
slipped right in there. I hardly have any work to do, and the fabric stayed fairly straight
as I had it held. Then next, go ahead and close the quick release
button. If it doesn’t want to close go ahead and loosen your screw a little bit more, then
close it. You can always come back and tighten it at the end, but don’t force this closed.
What’s nice is the reason for that quick release is that when you’re done, let’s say you were
going to hoop three more pieces that are cotton and two layers of stabilizer. All I have to
do is release, put my new fabric in, and close it up. That was I don’t have to be loosening
and tightening the screw as much, and it really is a huge time saver. Next thing I want to do is just show you,
I actually take the hoop and just with my thumbs on the inside, inner hoop, just push
the hoop just a little past flush. Not a lot, just a little bit. It helps make sure your
hoop is all the way into each other. It gives that last little bit of tighten all the way
around. Here we go, there. Now one thing that you will find that if you are working with
some fabrics with the larger hoops, right here the hoop is tight in the corners, but
sometimes a little loose along the middles. That’s what these clips are for. I don’t always use them, but boy when there’s
a time I need to use them I will pull them out so I can squeeze the hoops right here.
What you want to do is you line up … These are the top part that you actually end up
pinching. This goes the top part. Then there’s a small part the eases in between these little
notches, so when you look at it there’s a little tongue that sits inside these little
openings. Then they just squeeze the hoops together. Isn’t that fantastic? You can put those all around the hoop. You
have plenty. I will warn you if one of these gets on the floor and you step on it, it kind
of hurts. Almost worse than Legos, so keep those contained because they do sometimes
want to pop off. If you bump them they spring up so just keep that in mind. Now, when at all possible always use the hoop
size the machine recommends for you to stitch in. That means that if it’s a smaller design
use a smaller hoop, and your machine will actually tell you which hoop to use. We also
will be able to tell the machine we are using, so even if you are doing a small design and
you are using the big hoop, you can override it and tell the machine you know what you’re
doing. I always if I can, work with a smaller hoop
and once again, then you don’t need as much stabilizer, you’re not wasting as much fabric,
and you can get things in and out of a smaller hoop a little faster, and your machine will
actually embroider a little faster when you are working with smaller hoop sizes. It slows
down just a little bit when you’re working with the larger ones. That is how it’s going
to look like if you’re hooping with the smaller ones, and we’ll show you some efficient ways
throughout these videos of hooping, so you don’t always waste as much fabric as you see
around here. Let’s get started. Let’s get the embroidery
module on the machine and start to look around at what we are capable of doing with this
fantastic machine.

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