Photoshop Tutorial: How to Create a Fabric Patchwork Portrait of a Face from a Photo

Photoshop Tutorial: How to Create a Fabric Patchwork Portrait of a Face from a Photo


Hi. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV. I’m going to show you how to transform a photo
of someone into a fabric, patchwork portrait. Before we begin, I want to mention that I’ll
be moving a bit faster for more advanced users. I provided a fabric pattern preset that you
can download and install. Its link is located in my video’s description
or project files below. Make sure Photoshop is closed before you install
the fabric pattern preset. Then, you can open Photoshop. I did a tutorial showing how install presets,
so if you’re not sure how install patterns, I provided the tutorial’s link, as well. Open a sharp photo of a face that you’d like
to use for this project. It can be color or black and white. I downloaded this one from Shutterstock. To ensure that the filters will give you similar
results as mine, we’ll adjust your photo’s size and resolution with the Crop Tool. Make its Width and Height: 870 pixels each…and
its Resolution: 150 pixels per inch. Crop your image around the face. Next, we’ll separate our subject from its background by first, making a selection around our subject. For this image, I’ll use the Quick Selection
Tool with a radius of 10 pixels. Drag your cursor over the subject to select it. Click the Layer mask icon to make a layer
mask of the selection next to your subject. Make a new layer below it by Ctrl-clicking
or Cmd-clicking the New Layer icon. We’ll fill the empty layer with white, but
first, if your foreground and background colors aren’t black and white respectively, press
“D” on your keyboard. Since white is your background color, press
Ctrl or Cmd + Delete. Make the top layer active and convert it into
a Smart Object, so we can add filters to it non-destructively and adjust the filters if we want to. Go to Filter, Blur and Gaussian Blur. Blur it 5 pixels. Click the Adjustment layer icon and click “Black White”. Click the Adjustment Layer icon again and
this time, click “Posterize”. Make the number of Levels: 4. Click the eyeball icon to temporarily hide
the Blur Smart Filter and Ctrl-click or Cmd-click your subject to make a selection of its un-blurred shape. Make the Blur Smart Filter active visible again. We’ll make our visible image into a Smart
Object by scrolling the bottom of the Layers panel and making the bottom layer active. Scroll to the top and Shift-click the top
layer to make all the layers active. Then, convert them into one Smart Object. With our un-blurred selection still active,
click the Layer Mask icon to make a layer mask of the selection next to our Posterized subject. Make a new layer below it by Ctrl-clicking
or Cmd-clicking the New Layer icon. Then, fill it with white. Make the top layer active. We’re going to create separate layers for
each shade of our portrait. Open your Magic Wand Tool, reduce the Tolerance
to 1 and uncheck “Anti-alias” and “Contiguous”. Click anywhere on the black tone to select the black areas. Click the New Layer icon to make a new layer. Click the Layer Mask icon to make a layer
mask of the selection next to the empty layer. Make the middle layer active and this time, click your Magic Wand Tool on the darkest grey tone. Make the top layer active and click the New
Layer icon to make a new layer. As before, click the Layer Mask icon to make
a layer mask of this selection. To create the next tone, make your subject
active and click the light grey tone. As before, make the top layer active, click
the New Layer icon and the Layer Mask icon. To create the lightest tone is a little trickier,
but not difficult. First, make your subject active and click
anywhere on a white area. To see why it’s a bit trickier, press “Q”
on your keyboard to make it into a quick mask. As you can see, the white area includes, not
just the lightest tone of the face, but also the background. To isolate just the white areas of the face, first press “Q” again to revert the quick mask back into a selection. Go to your subject’s layer mask and press Ctrl + Shift + Alt on Windows or Cmd + Shift + Option on a Mac. Now, when we press “Q” again, we can see that
we’ve isolated just the white areas of the face. Repeat the same steps: Make the top layer
active, click the new Layer icon and click the Layer mask icon. Name the top layer “Highlights”, the next
layer, “Light Midtones”, the third layer, “Dark Midtones” and the last layer, “Shadows”. We’re ready to start adding the fabric patterns, but first make sure you’ve already installed a fabric pattern preset. Scroll to the bottom and name the bottom layer, “Background”. Click the “fx” icon and click, “Pattern Overlay”. Open the fly-out list and click the gear icon
to open your list of pattern presets. Click the fabric preset that you’d like to use. When you see this message, click OK to replace
your current patterns with the new fabric patterns. I’ll click “Fabric 1”. Click, “Inner Glow”. Click the color box and pick black. Then, click OK or press Enter or Return. Change the Blend Mode to “Linear Burn” and
the Opacity to 20%. The Source is “Edge”, the Choke is 0% and
the Size is 20 pixels. Double-click on an empty area of the Posterize
layer to open its Layer Style window. Click “Outer Glow”. Click the color box and pick black. Then, press Enter or Return. The Blend Mode is “Linear Burn”, the Opacity
is 20% and the Size is 15 pixels. Make the “Shadows’ layer active and press Alt or Option + Delete to fill it with black. Double-click it to open its Layer Style window. Click “Pattern Overlay”. Open your patterns and pick the darkest one
to use for the shadows of your portrait. “Fabric 2”. Click “Bevel & Emboss”. The Style is “Outer Bevel” and the Technique
is “Chisel Hard”. The Depth is 100% and the Direction is Down. The Size is 0 pixels and Soften it 16 pixels. The Angle is 120 degrees and the Altitude is 30 degrees. The Highlight Mode is “Linear Dodge” and the
color is white. The Opacity is 85%. The Shadow Mode is “Linear Burn”, the color is black and its opacity is 20%. Repeat the steps by making the next layer
active and filling it with black. Double-click it to open its Layer Style window
and click “Pattern Overlay”. This time, pick a dark pattern to use for
the Dark Midtones of your subject. I’ll pick “Denim Roses 1”. Scroll to the top and make the “Light Midtones”
layer active. Fill it with black, double-click it and click
“Pattern Overlay”. Pick a medium or light-toned pattern for the
light midtones of your subject. I’ll pick “Canvas 2”. Click “Bevel & Emboss”. The Style is “Outer Bevel” and the Technique
is “Chisel Hard”. The Size is 3 pixels and Soften it 12 pixels. The Highlight Mode is “Linear Dodge” with
an opacity of 50% and the Shadow Mode is “Linear Burn” and its opacity is 30%. Make the top layer active and fill it with black. Double-click it to open its Layer Style window. Click “Pattern Overlay” and choose a light
pattern to use for the highlights of your subject. I’m choosing “Canvas 4”. Click “Bevel & Emboss”. The Style is “Outer Bevel”, the Technique
is “Chisel Hard” and the Depth is 100%. The Direction is “Down”, the Size is 1 pixel
and Soften it 6 pixels. The Highlight Mode is “Linear Dodge” with
an Opacity if 50%. The Shadow Mode is “Linear Burn” and its Opacity
of 30%. Click “Inner Shadow”. The Blend Mode is Multiply, the color is black
and the Opacity is 30%. The Distance is 3 pixels and the Size is 8 pixels. Lastly, I’d like to brighten my overall portrait. If you’d like to do this, as well, click the
Adjustment layer icon and click, “Levels”. Drag the Input highlights slider to the left
until your happy with its brightness. This Marty from Blue Lightning TV. Thanks for watching!

26 Replies to “Photoshop Tutorial: How to Create a Fabric Patchwork Portrait of a Face from a Photo”

  1. Wow! This is amazing! Please do more fantasy and sci fi font tutorial. You're an amazing teacher of ps. 😂😊

  2. Great tutorial again! I learn so much from your video's! I have a question; Is it legally alowed to use photo's of celebrity's in Photoshop (or Gimp) tutorials? I Hope you will answer. Thanks again!

  3. Really like this one, Marty, thanks! I like the techniques for separating the different colours onto different layers.
    Thanks for the links to the textures.

  4. Ctrl+Shift+Alt isn't working during isolating white colour of face from background white whenever the face white isn't linked with the background(like well separated from background by light grey or any other colors and making a closed area inside the face)unlike yours.What should I do?I've wasted many hours on it.Still I can't isolate them.Which causes trouble later during fabric work.Any help would be deeply appreciable.

  5. ctrl +shift+ alt command is not working …bcoz of this. fabric color are also not be impelented help plz regarding .. i m trying again and again but i dont khow what is my fault..

  6. Excellent. I learned several techniques in this video. I often need to posterize a photo so I can create a svg file for cutting on tool and dye machines such as a Cricut cutter. Your selection technique has simplified this for me quite a bit. I would love to know how Lola Landau created her textured patterns with such depth. Fabric looked real. Thank you for great tutorials.

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