Printing On Fabric Part 4: Taping Fabric to Core | HP Latex | HP

Printing On Fabric Part 4: Taping Fabric to Core | HP Latex | HP


Now that the fabric is through the printer
and everything is ready to load on the take-up roll, there’s a couple things to consider. We put the core on. The core is a little bit longer than the fabric,
so everything is ready there. Now, when you load fabric, sometimes what
you’ll find, is that is loads too much, and then you can’t feed it backward. You have a couple options there. Option one is, you cut it. If you do cut it, I recommend having a really
good pair of fabric shears that you only use for fabric; they’re helpful. They’re going to cut through the fabric cleanly
and they’re not going to fray. If you use just any old scissors, a lot of times they’re going to mangle the fabric pretty badly. So, buy a good pair of fabric scissors and
use those exclusively for the fabric. That’s my recommendation. You can cut it, and cutting it’s going to have some waste. The machine’s not going to let you roll any backward. Sorry, it just happens that way. However, what I’ll do sometimes is, I’ll lift the lever and I’ll and I’ll kind of slide it back and pull it, and slide it back and pull it, and, basically, I’ll rewind it on the roll kind of manually. In this case, I just cut it. I’m a little pressed for time, so, I just
trimmed off the edge; there’s maybe a foot. Once that’s done, I’m going to put the tape on it. I like three pieces of tape. I want it very secure on that core. Now, if you put the tape on the fabric, just
as is, what’s going to tend to happen is, the tape is going to come right off that fabric. So, it’s going to tape to the core, and that’s going to stick. But, the tape on the fabric isn’t going to
stick, and that’s going to distort, you having it on the take-up roll evenly, which is very important. So, what I recommend is, just take household stapler, go to the edge here, slide it into there, and go, chunk. So, now you’re putting staples on the tape to the fabric. That’s going to hold this tape on the fabric. And it’s going to allow you to put some tension
on it, and it won’t pull off the fabric. It’s sort of an old trick. So, you’re going to put some staples… I usually put two on each of the pieces of tape. And, we’ll do the last one down here. Very easy. And, you know, that’s all ready to go onto the take-up roll. I habitually cut, like a tiny little curve
into most things, because I’m going to load the middle first, that’s going to be a little
longer, and then I’m going to load the edges. Now, when I load them onto the core, first I put the middle on, and get that nice and right. And then I take the ones in the edges and
ever so gently, I pull it out a little bit. So, what I’m doing is the center, and then pulling them out. Not much, you’re just putting a tiny little
bit of pull off to the right on that side, and off to the left on this, so that it kind of gives it a nice even tension all the way through. Once that’s done – we’ll put it on here
in a second – then I roll it forward, insert the Dancer bar, and then initiate the take-up reel. I want to tell it that the take-up reel is on, because that way it’s going to re-engage the OMAS to measure the step alignment and recalculate the step alignment with the material having some tension applied. And, at that point, you stand back and look
at everything and if everything’s right, you are good to go. You’ll find that when everything is on the
take-up roll and it’s nice and even, and your take-up roll is a little longer, no end caps,
fabric will print beautiful on a Latex printer.

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