School Dress Codes Are an Epic FAIL

School Dress Codes Are an Epic FAIL


If public schools graded their dress code
policies like they do students, they’d probably get suspended faster than you can say ‘fingertip
length rule’. And don’t feel bad if you can’t say fingertip
length rule all that fast because I also cannot. Fingertip length rule. Fingertip length rule. Fingertip—finger—fingertip length rule. Even though kids have been expected to dress
appropriately for school pretty much since public school was invented, dress codes became
especially trendy in the 1990s in the name of deterring gang participation and lowering
rates of on campus violence. In 1996 President Bill Clinton advocated for
school uniforms in his State of the Union address so that teenagers would quote, ‘..stop
killing each other over designer jackets.’ But in 1999 after the mass shooting at Columbine
high school in Littleton, Colorado, schools around the country began enforcing more and
tighter dress codes, largely due to sensationalized media reports about the Columbine shooters’
participation in the so-called ‘trench coat mafia.’ For awhile there, goth-related clothing was
considered as dangerous as gang-related paraphernalia. If we fast-forward to today, a majority of
American schools enforce some kind of dress code and more than 11% have adopted uniform
policies all due to the underlying belief dress codes foster safer and more effective
learning environments or the whole ‘dress for success’ concept. But on the whole in terms of making kids smarter
and safer, dress code policies get a big fat ‘F’. For fail. And farce. And friggin’ ridiculous. For starters, dress code policies haven’t
exactly gone gangbusters on busting up gang-related activity on campus considering how in 1989,
15% of American public school students reported gang activity on campus and compared to 46%
in 2011. As for all those teenagers supposedly killing
themselves over designer jackets, data from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention
finds that the youth homicide rate on school campuses has remained pretty much flat for
the past 10 years so school dress code polices get a B for basically worthless because it
hasn’t made it worse but it hasn’t made it better. Tragically, school dress code policies also
have not stopped mass shootings considering how there have been 270 since Columbine which
have killed more than 141 people. As for school dress codes fostering more productive
learning environments, they get not one F, but two. According to the National Assessment of Educational
Progress, from the 1970s to 2012, 17-year-olds have shown 0 improvement in math and reading. The achievement gap between white students
and students of color has closed so slowly and narrowly that experts think it will take
250 years for it to close in math and over 150 years for it to close in reading. Wow, t-shirts aren’t going to solve literacy
problems. So it’s little wonder then that there is
no conclusive research finding that school dress codes and uniform policies consistently
improve learning environments and school safety. And I haven’t even mentioned all of the
sexist, homophobic and transphobic dress code polices that tend to get the most media attention
today because a lot of those debates skip over the blatantly statistical fact that school
dress codes have already failed to do what they set out which is make kids safer and
smarter. In which case, I’m legitimately wondering,
what should school kids be required if anything to wear? If public schools graded their dress code
policies like they do students, they’d probably get suspended faster than you can say ‘fingertip
length rule’. And don’t feel bad if you can’t say fingertip length rule all that
fast because I also cannot. Fingertip length rule. Fingertip length rule. Fingertip—finger—fingertip
length rule. Even though kids have been expected to dress
appropriately for school pretty much since public school was invented, dress codes became
especially trendy in the 1990s in the name of deterring gang participation and lowering
rates of on campus violence. In 1996 President Bill Clinton advocated for school uniforms
in his State of the Union address so that teenagers would quote, ‘..stop killing each
other over designer jackets.’ But in 1999 after the mass shooting at Columbine high
school in Littleton, Colorado, schools around the country began enforcing more and tighter
dress codes, largely due to sensationalized media reports about the Columbine shooters’
participation in the so-called ‘trench coat mafia.’ For awhile there, goth-related clothing
was considered as dangerous as gang-related paraphernalia. If we fast-forward to today,
a majority of American schools enforce some kind of dress code and more than 11% have
adopted uniform policies all due to the underlying belief dress codes foster safer and more effective
learning environments or the whole ‘dress for success’ concept. But on the whole in
terms of making kids smarter and safer, dress code policies get a big fat ‘F’. For fail.
And farce. And friggin’ ridiculous. For starters, dress code policies haven’t exactly
gone gangbusters on busting up gang-related activity on campus considering how in 1989,
15% of American public school students reported gang activity on campus and compared to 46%
in 2011. As for all those teenagers supposedly killing themselves over designer jackets,
data from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention finds that the youth homicide rate
on school campuses has remained pretty much flat for the past 10 years so school dress
code polices get a B for basically worthless because it hasn’t made it worse but it hasn’t
made it better. Tragically, school dress code policies also have not stopped mass shootings
considering how there have been 270 since Columbine which have killed more than 141
people. As for school dress codes fostering more productive learning environments, they
get not one F, but two. According to the National Assessment of Educational Progress, from the
1970s to 2012, 17-year-olds have shown 0 improvement in math and reading. The achievement gap between
white students and students of color has closed so slowly and narrowly that experts think
it will take 250 years for it to close in math and over 150 years for it to close in
reading. Wow, t-shirts aren’t going to solve literacy problems. So it’s little wonder
then that there is no conclusive research finding that school dress codes and uniform
policies consistently improve learning environments and school safety. And I haven’t even mentioned
all of the sexist, homophobic and transphobic dress code polices that tend to get the most
media attention today because a lot of those debates skip over the blatantly statistical
fact that school dress codes have already failed to do what they set out which is make
kids safer and smarter. In which case, I’m legitimately wondering, what should school
kids be required if anything to wear? And of course that’s kidz with a z because I’m
really cool and hip like that.

100 Replies to “School Dress Codes Are an Epic FAIL”

  1. I went to a school that had students from kindergarden to the last year of highschool. Out of the blue in my last year, they decided to add a dresscode, as well as uniforms for sports. The uniform was unisex obviously, and the sizes went up to… the equivalent of a women's medium-large, as they didn't really account for older kids when they ordered the uniforms. So bigger kids (as well as tall kids!) couldn't even wear it. Thankfully, the P.E. teacher understood and let us wear whatever we wanted, we just had to hope that the school administration wouldn't come check out our uniforms.

  2. I think that public schools have the right to set dress codes as long as they are enforced equally. I think the idea of school dress codes radically helping curb violence and inequality is ridiculous. School dress codes should be there as a general guide of what is and isn't acceptable for that particular school.

  3. at my high school I was not to show shoulders so as kids we wore sure that it made a male teacher ejaculate and we all believed it was true

  4. It's like a shoulder is a shoulder not a sexual distracting body part and it's like oh the kid must be distanced by that persons cloths but no it's actually because they keep talking like come on teachers

  5. I wore a t-shirt with Jack Sparrow on it (I went to high school during the time of the first movie). I got in trouble for this movie based shirt. Why? Jack Sparrow was holding a gun. It wasn't a dominate feature of the shirt, his face was…

    But you know, school safety.

    Actually, my school gave up on enforcing the dress code for me because they threatened to call my mom so much and when they did and my mom came to school to "deal with me", she yelled at the teachers I should note I was in a baggy clothing, gothic phase. Never "indecent" according the my schools "dress code" She finally told them if they took her from work one more time due to my "dress code violations" and she walked into the school and say a girl in a mini skirt with her butt cheeks hanging out and she is not in trouble, she would sue the school. As they were obviously picking on her straight- A Goth kid because she didn't look like a "preppy bitch".

    Yeah, my mom is bad ass.

  6. I really don't see anything wrong with uniforms. The only ridiculous part of uniforms is the rationale behind it – there's no need to rationalize anything if you have a uniform policy. Dress Codes, on the other hand, are stupid.

  7. I hate how girls have to change their clothing to not distract boys but I get distracted all the time from their clothes like sexiest much?

  8. My only thought on this issue is that I do think young people need to learn how to dress appropriately for business/ an interview. In my mind that is a life skills that the current dress code policies are doing a bad job of fostering. This is especially an issue in lower income schools like the once I attended where we weren't as exposed to people who wore business casual attire to work. Took me a while to master this skill, I look back to the first office job I had the summer after highschool and wow, I did a bad job of dressing myself

  9. Uniform requirements actally make it easier for people looking school age looking people to sneak in. When everyone looks the same, your mind is more likely to put the other students into the background. You won't have a background memorization of most kids faces. You'll just think "oh they belong".

  10. My school had dress code and honestly I think it was fine. I followed dress code it was no big deal. I mean I do understand that at some schools shoulders and collar bones seem to be an issue and I agree that is going a little too far. But the girls who got dress code for wearing short shorts that I frequently saw them picking out of their asses (both skinny girls and bigger girls) I think that was needed. Or the practically see through shirts or showing the mid drift. Its school why would one feel the need to dress like they are going out to the club? My county has one of the highest teen pregnancy rates in the country. When I did a survey in my school one of the questions was "Why do you dress the way you do at school?" 78% of the answers said "To impress the guys" the other 22% were a mixed bag of "wanting to wear that was popular" and "it was on sale." It could just be where I live but the only time the girls were shout sexism is when they actually got caught for their shorts or blouse by a male teacher. If it was a female teacher they wouldn't say anything. I just don't see the point in wearing some of the things the girls did in my high school. I think the only time I got dress code was once in junior high. A female pe teacher told me my shorts were too short after her daughter and her friends (who had shorter shorts than me) walked in front of me. I fought it and proved that my shorts were not against the dress code. Its simple you can still wear whats popular and weather friendly without getting dress code. I went to high school in an area where it hit 116-117 in the Summer and far into Fall.

  11. When I started high school my uniform dress code wasn't very strict it almost looked like we weren't wearing a uniform at all but one day they got stricter with it & one of the students asked the dean why and he said that it was because someone had ran through the school while everyone was in class & he thought it was a student at 1st then realized it was actually someone who'd broken into the school and basically the uniform was to distinguish us from strangers. They also said that by wearing the uniform we are representing the school and creating a community among the students

  12. I don't think you can really get away from dress codes entirely, seeing as some rules do need to be enforced. Example: don't be completely naked. Personally, what the code IS is somewhat less important to me than that it be applied consistently and in a gender blind manner. Of course, if I had a kid in school I'd prefer whatever arbitrary set of rules it's comprised of to be the product of a minimalist philosophy about regulating dress. Judging from my own high school and middle school experience, quibbling over shorts for being one inch too short or making a big deal out of the presence of spaghetti straps did nothing but needlessly strain student-teacher relationships.

    That being said, I can't say I'm not sympathetic to the alternative Clinton uniform idea. Not because I'm an uptight stickler with a thing against fashion and THEM DAMN DISRESPECTFUL YOUNGINS ("Get off my lawn!") but because – and here's a new video/podcast idea for you, Cristen and Caroline – I recall from my k12 days how clothing was a way that kids drew early class distinctions, which often became a basis for bullying. A teen dealt with exclusion if their clothing weren't nice enough, criticism if they wore the same outfit twice, stress when their parents either couldn't afford to get them more clothing or didn't understand why they needed 30 shirts. I daily thought about these things as a kid, which actually WERE massively distracting. I don't know if it's true, but my impression was always that this issue was more pronounced with the girls than with the guys.

  13. I think a restaurant "no shirt, no shoes, no service"-type dress code would be enough? Like, wear underwear, wear shoes, don't show your privates/nips/underwear. While to a degree I agree on the point that uniforms make everyone ~the same~and ~equal~ in practice that is not entirely true. As long as kids are allowed to accessorize and bring whichever shoe/bag/phone they can afford, they will be able to tell who has money and who doesn't. It was that way in my school, though bullying didn't really happen over who had more or less means but about who fit the "normal" mold the least and would be easy prey as they would not defend themselves. I think if people want to abuse others then no dress code and no uniform will really stop them.

  14. I go to a school where we don't have dress codes at all and we literally don't have any problems with anything. I never understood why dress codes were a thing because everyone just respected each other and didn't like sexual harass anyone for a fucking bra strap. Idk maybe it's because I go to a hippie school but it seems that if you teach kids to be respectful towards each other due to what people wear then you won't have problems.

  15. A school uniform, for me as a child, was a huge relief. We were poor, many of my clothes were hand-me-downs, and certainly not big brands. A school uniform meant we were all wearing the same thing and it negated a huge portion of my bulling. Of course, this is just my experience with it.

    This might sound odd, but here goes. I agree with uniforms, but not most dress codes. To clarify, if the school doesn't have a uniform, the dress code most have are silly. Fingertip rule? Ridiculous. I have shortish arms and a long torso, my fingertips barely reach past my mons. Some girls have very long arms and short torsos, so their fingertips might be closer to their knees than hips. I think dress codes should be identical for boys and girls, they should be enforced equally, and not overly strict.

    So much of the dress codes aimed at girls is very much so they aren't a DISTRACTION to boys. This is insulting to both girls and boys. It is shaming her body, while insinuating that boys have no control over themselves. People are GOING to look at each other, especially in high school with hormones raging. This is true regardless of what they wear. How about we stop treating young women like shameful things to hide away, and stop treating young men like they're uncontrollable animals.

  16. I went to school in Canada and in a pretty rural area so we never had to worry about gangs or anything like that but I had a uniform until the 9th grade and while it was exciting at first to be able to wear what i wanted the glamour wore off real fast. I have never been a morning person and one more thing to have to deal with in the morning was a pain being one of the teacher's pets I never got called in on dress code in high school but i did know it was a pain that different teachers enforced different things of the dress code. For example one female teacher though that girls shouldn't wear more than 3 rings on each hand or more than one pair of earrings and It got to the point that model students that normally didn't wear any jewelry would put it on a bunch of it before going to her class.

  17. These weren't any of the reasons to why we wear school uniforms in the UK when I was in primary and secondary, it was more the case of identity and knowing that if you got lost or something happened to you the place where you studied would be notified and that would then lead to the parents being informed.

    Of course other reasons include not having to worry about what to wear and general utility since my blazers contained handy pockets for stationary rather than needing to carry a cumbersome pencil case. That and the usual reasons of fostering a community and school identity, which is effectively acting as "free" adverts and if the student was wearing said uniform the whilst doing something a passerby/person could report them whether it be good or bad.

  18. I feel like the dress codes make me less focused because they make me feel fat and I spend my time thinking about it and trying to find a way to sit where I don't look fat rather than doing work

  19. School dress codes have just morphed into policing girls clothing choices to the point where back-to-school clothing ads often feature clothes that most girls in the US can't even wear to school. I've worn things to work that are totally fine in a work environment but I would never have been able to wear to school. Dress codes right now only enforce that girls don't have any ownership of their bodies and they're at the mercy of their male peers and school administrators. This also doesn't help with genderqueer/trans youth who may need safety in their self-expression away from home. (TW) This can cause children of all genders so many problems including rape, body image problems, low self-confidence (meaning things like accepting low pay for equal work), suicide and domestic abuse.

  20. I think, rather than policing what kids can and can't wear, they should be educated on what to wear in different work enviroments, what is appropriate and what isn't. Obviously, genitals shouldn't be visible or hanging out, but if a bra strap is seen, some underwear accidentally pokes out, or a shoulder/ankle is seen, that's not a problem and shouldn't be treated with such hate. 🙂

  21. Did dress codes really only emerge as we think of them in the 90s? I mean, I don't know that there were elaborate lists of rules before that, but I definitely recall my mother telling me that when she was in school in the 60s, girls were still obligated to wear skirts (for exemple). Ironically, I'm not sure they would allow the kind of skirts they had to wear then today, as, still according to my mother, it was hard to find skirts longer than the fashionable miniskirt at the time!

  22. They have uniforms here in UK as a way to make all students equal. Not to reduce the likely hood of gun related school shootings lol America.

  23. I live in a country where everyone has to go to the army at 18 and finish at 20-21. Of course, the army has it's (unbelievably uncomfortable) uniform and specific rules. Also, many jobs (not essentially jobs where you're supposed to represent some values or be around customers) don't allow wearing tank tops/shorts/piercings etc for whatever reason.
    So what I'm saying is, if I can't wear what I want at school, and later in the army, and later at work – when is that point in life when It's possible?

  24. the tendency for boys and men's clothing to be baggy and have more complete coverage, where women's clothing tends to be tighter and more revealing makes it very difficult to propose any sort of dress code without seeming at least a bit biased against women. Obviously kids shouldn't be allowed to wear whatever they want and there should definitely be limits, but the current political climate makes it impossible to say anything definitively

  25. I go to an all girls school, where we are constantly told our clothing is 'inappropriately short' when in actual fact the dresses/skirts we buy are the length sold in shops for our age range? Also, sending pupils out of lessons for wearing sports kit instead of their normal clothes seems excessive – where's the logic in making a pupil miss out on class time when they are simply wearing sports kit?

  26. In England up until 16 I had a uniform and then until 18 I got to wear literally anything I wanted to at all with no rules. That meant that in summer I'd wear an off the shoulder crop top with shorts and have absolutely no problems at all, neither with my peers nor with the school itself. I'm really glad I had that, because those two years I got to experiment and develop my style, and it helped me have a lot of fun with clothes. Of course, I still understand that I couldn't wear the same things in all kinds of work places; that's just common sense, but I gained confidence with my body and with my style, and I wouldn't trade that for the world.

  27. My county and I'm assuming the ones surrounding us don't have a fingertip length rule, it had to go to the middle of you knee or you go to the office. mostly girls though

  28. My county and I'm assuming the ones surrounding us don't have a fingertip length rule, it had to go to the middle of you knee or you go to the office. mostly girls though

  29. In my time as a student, the only dress code violations I remember were girls. My friend and I were specifically shamed in front of the entire grade for wearing shorts that did not follow the fingertip length rule. It's stupid, archaic, and ineffective. Teachers and administrators should have better things to do with their time, boys need to stop being taught that sexualizing and objectifying a girl's body is okay or normal, and LGBTQ should be allowed to wear whatever genderized or non-gendered clothing they want.

    People often forget that dress codes were more restrictive in the past. Especially when it comes to gender. In most schools, boys were expected to wear their hair short and clean cut while girls were expected to only wear dresses or skirts. Teachers would patrol the halls to measure girls skirt length and would cut boys' hair if it was too long.

    Most universities don't have dress codes and I don't see it hindering the learning environment at all (nor is everyone running around naked). In fact I think it adds to it, because without a dress code you can learn about people who are different from you.

    Conformity does not allow for individual expression or creativity which are the foundations of how many people became successful (not to mention happy). Once our society realizes that, we can move on to more important issues affecting the education of our youth including literacy, poverty, and over-testing.

  30. the trench coat mafia, Evan in Portugal I got shit in school for earring metal and reading goth literature, and out course the black clothes

  31. Hi Cristen! Hannah here. I love your videos and have rediscovered them recently. I watched your video on feeling guilty about having sex and post-coital sadness, which I struggle with sometimes. I have recently come out to my friends and boyfriend as bisexual, and luckily they are very accepting as my bf is also bi. Although they are wonderful, I can't help but feel guilty about my sexuality because I was raised by homophobic parents who I feel I could never come out to. I don't know how to overcome this barrier despite the support from my friends and bf I have and nothing from my personal research has yielded helpful results about guilt of one's sexuality. Is there anything you can say on the matter?

  32. My son went to a public school which required uniforms and then a charter school for the arts which had little to no dress code. On his campus tour before registering we saw several kids in jaw dropping attire. The only time he was too "distracted" by other students' clothing choices (at the no dress code school) was Halloween his first year where he was too creeped out by the realistic costume that another child wore that day. Instead of shaming the "scary" kid, they just sent my kid home early that day.

  33. I grew up in a very poor family. I honestly wish there had been uniforms. that way,the poorer and richer students would have had an equal field. heres my other point, we had the finger tip rule,and guess what? they pushed the limits,to purposely see how much they could get away with. It, uniforms or a dress code, prepares them for the uniforms they have for work later in life. You cant have a bra strap showing at work. you cant have your breasts or ass hanging out at work. why should school environment be any different?

  34. I had uniforms in high school- the rich popular kids remained rich popular kids, the gang members remained gang members, the poor kids got picked on even more because they had LESS "normal" clothes to wear on the weekends/afternoons (because no one is voluntarily putting that thing on), and our time in class was spent being inspected for uniform violations rather than education.

    So, yes, they get a big fat F.

  35. Dress codes have some benefits, but it depends on what they restrict. School uniforms are a slap in the face to individual expression.

  36. Would like to see a similar video but about wearing business attire to work. Most people I know would be far more relaxed and happier at work if they could wear clothes they're comfortable in.

  37. Can you do a video about science of breakfast food? Why is it that in a lot of cultures what we eat for breakfast is exclusively for breakfast while we don't make a big distinction about lunch and dinner. Are the nutritional needs o what we can tolerate in the morning significantly than in the rest of the day? How does any theories about this explain the big diversity of breakfast foods across different cultures (cereal, eggs, cucumber/tomatoes/olives (Mediterranean), sausages (german/northern european)?

  38. Uniforms should be required at all grade levels. Correlation does not imply causation. By your logic, we can assume Obamacare raised healthcare costs.

  39. Still there is nothing wrong with expecting students to dress with some form of class because thats just common sense. I didnt get dress code in high school ever because i didnt push it. My shorts covered my butt and i didnt let my bra straps hang out or my stomach show. Because why should anyone be dressing like that anyway? You wouldnt wear showy clothes to work so why is school different

  40. Dress codes are so people don't go half naked to school . You are going to school not to a rave. Don't need a 5 minute video to know that . Stop trying to be edgy.

  41. I understand the inherent moral policing and puritanical notions of "appropriate" behavior that goes behind the practice of ascertaining dress codes or uniforms in school. However, there is one side of the argument which I am not entirely sure how exactly to think about and would like your views on it. I am from India, a country largely deemed "third world" because of the astonishing amount of poverty which affects the life of people. I am not getting into the details but obviously one would know that the kind of poverty that exists in America is also of a different nature than that there is in an third world country. All schools in India have uniforms. Because of extreme class difference, there are schools both government and otherwise which cater to students coming from different kinds of social backgrounds which needless to say in one way or the other gets reflected in the kinds of the clothes they wear. I presume that if they were to wear the dresses they normally do and not school uniforms, the class differences would be much more apparent in the class room. Now one could say that's okay but notwithstanding the already pervasive classist society that we live in, in a classroom filled with young minds much sensitive and susceptible to social pressure, the presumably apparent class difference represented via their casual clothes might be prone to create a tense and anxious environment. Schools often have cases of bullying where anyone who is presumed to be different or "inferior" in anyway falls prey either to being bullied or being depressed because they do not meet up the standards of the "cool" people. Now, all these happens irrespective of the fact that there are uniforms, however, schools here do put forward the probability of temporarily nullifying the social differences and creating an "uniform"-ity in class room as a valid reason for the practice of dress code. On a different note, I would like to add that countries like mine also have government schools with students coming from backgrounds so difficult that having any sort of dress other than the two or three they already have is a privilege. My mother teaches in such a government school where the school authorities should mandatorily provide uniforms for free to all the students and that for many are a heartwarming instance of happiness. Of finally adding an extra dress to the shelf, no matter what that is.

  42. 35 years as a teacher…I can easily accept the failure of dress codes but than doesn't mean I didn't want to tear out my eyes after seeing a student…or rather seeing too much of a student. I had a male German foreign exchange student who like wearing the pre-Jordan small/tight basketball pants. Almost like painted on… Girls who wore plunging neckline blouses, guys with the super baggy pants wearing dirty underwear, girls wearing cute skirts after a couple growth spurts left then way too short/much too tight…
    There is so simple answer… I do know that I taught in a school that had a uniform code. Students told me they didn't like the required garb BUT they also said no worry about what to wear to school & that they didn't have worry about being competitive about expensive outfits…

  43. I went to a private school and, surprise, had to wear a uniform. It did nothing to stop bullying – if anything it made it worse – I would see constant competition of girls trying to make their uniform the "sluttiest" – and if your skirt was too long, you were considered a prude by all the girls and guys, and if it was too short, you were given detention. I remember getting detention NOT because my skirt was too shirt (or too long – yes, we would get detention if our skirts were too long), but because I forgot, ONE DAY, to wear my kilt pin! Junior High and High School were awful – and the uniforms did nothing to make those years better.

  44. The only reason my school had a dress code was because a number of students came from poor backgrounds and they didn't want anyone to be harassed or teased about it. The school even provided the shirts we had to wear, the pants, belts and shoes were allowed a little more wiggle room and if a student didn't have a specific item for the day, the office would provide them with a spare. Though I will admit, I'm not sure if what the uniform did anything to stop bullying since it was introduced early in my first year there and I was only eight at the time…

  45. I say that as long as shit isn't hanging out, its fine
    which means, no swimsuits, nospeedos, that sort of shit for the smartasses
    short shorts and crop tops are fine as long as no ass, tits, or coot is hanging out.
    another thing to, id love to see guys going to school in short shorts XD

  46. Hey if you see this, i entered in the sock it to me contest. My name is luna largent and i just wanted to say that you are the person i go to for correctanswers on puberty and other questions thanks. And good luck on judging!!

  47. I'm an advocate for uniforms. Cheap ones mind you. For the kids that can't afford to buy that many nice clothes. Also, this opens up more money for clothes outside of school because then you could have money to throw money on a couple of nice outfits just for those occasions. If people are that annoyed that they can't express themselves creatively they can have a choice of wearing a different tie or belt as an accessory for uniforms.

  48. Dress codes are more for policing. To find the bad apples you have to have a reason to be suspicious. If everything is the same then when you see something different then you have a reason to be suspicious.

    Why are they different? Why did the "pattern" change?

    If everything is random then how do you find what is bad? How do you justify being suspicious?

  49. Dress codes are fascism. It's an attempt by our Masters to foster and nurture a conformist mentality. The rationale behind them is the same thing as saying that the Columbine shootings would have been less immoral and heinous if the perpetrators had all been wearing the same clothing as the victims. That is itself a heinous twisting of logic. When you ban unique clothing because it expresses membership in a cultural group that is hostile to individual rights and individualist moral codes, you also ban unique clothing that expresses membership in a cultural group that SUPPORTS individual rights and individualist moral codes.

  50. Dress-codes have NOT failed to make kids safer and smarter. Dress-codes were never an attempt to make kids safer and smarter. They were an attempt to create an idea that morality depends on uniformity, and that we should all fear those who ARE different and also fear those who are not very different themselves but defend the rights of OTHERS to be different. Dress-codes are designed to create a fear of the atypical, a fear of the abnormal. Dress-codes are designed to quash dissent and create fear of those who DO dissent and fear of those who might not themselves be dissenting but will defend the rights of OTHER to dissent. Dress-codes are designed to stomp on the idea that public morality requires that we accept that those who are culturally different from us also have rights. Dress-codes have not failed to make kids smarter and safer because you can't fail at something that you are sincerely attempting to do.

  51. I was ''goth'' / whatever the main director would like to call it and they denied us the right to wear corset. Even if we put it over appropriate ( even more appropriate then the blond bubbly cheerleader) shirt. They ''slut shamming'' us in front of everyone while we were taking a group picture. As rebellion, the week later almost every girl come in school the monday morning with corset on. I hated high school but in my town we understand what '' stronger together'' means. Even the main director was female. She considered corset as fetish and sexual clothing. She even write to our parent to ashame them as ''irresponsable'' .

  52. Had uniforms at my school, and while there were a group of 3 girls who constantly got slammed for rolling their skirts up super high, the boys got most of the shit. (untucked shirts, sagging and bagging, wearing hats…)

    Uniforms are awesome. It meant that I didn't have to bother figuring out what to wear in the morning.

  53. My old school enforced a dress code that required the girls to wear knee length shorts. Due to this, if the girls didn't want to wear basketball shorts as many of the guys did, they had to run in PE in jeans (BTW, they also banned leggings), because they couldn't change for PE. I just don't see the point!

  54. I feel like dress codes are horrible. They over sexualize little girls, from ages 5 to 18, or WHENEVER you go to school. It's EXTREMELY sexist. A girl going to school can't wear shorts that are not finger tip length, but because a male student is a boy, he can wear shorts up to his mid thigh and not get in trouble for it. Seriously?! It also keeps people from expressing themselves. A boy wants to wear a skirt or dress? Who are you to stop them?! If that's what they want to wear, let them wear it. If a girl can wear pants AND skirts, than why can't boys? Plus, as long as it doesn't count as indecent exposure, it's not against the law! A girl is exposing stomach or showing cleavage? That's nothing you wouldn't see at a swimming pool. And last time I checked, bot girls and boys have shoulders, collar bones, legs, stomach, thighs, etc. Why does the dress code still even exist?

  55. I'll say it generally kept classism at bay in my school since no one was able to spot which kids were poor and which ones were rich, even though most us were poor lol It was annoying however, getting infraction for my shirt being untucked at coming in from recess or not having my top button done or forgetting my belt, which were general just kid stuff that you're punishing someone for. But at the same time I didn't have to purchase mew clothes often nor think about what I had to wear in the morning, simply re-wash my uniform the night before of whatever. I WILL say they were harsh on the girls in my school with the skirts they wore, though the true rebels would hike their skirts up past their thighs any way lol. With that said, I eventually came to HATE uniforms after wearing them for what…14 years? till senior year of high school, because you're being told how to dress for so long, I think there's just something about the will to express yourself physically and control what you wear that gets fed up after a while. That's why it makes sense to me that so many women are backlashing against dress codes and uniforms but it's connected to a larger system. I think it comes down to having control over your own body. It seems like nowadays women have so many different things in media telling them what to do with their bodies that I think the stress from dress codes has been so internalized it's becoming a backlash. Women are just tired of people and rules telling them what to do with their bodies, whether it's helpful or not, because they've been told what to do for so long y'know?

  56. if you're going to have IMPOSSIBLE standards in today's society on what's appropriate, then shove everyone in a uniform, saves parents money, saves kids from a headache of shopping for school appropriate clothing, and it'd generally be easier on everyone, give them variety with it though, none of that catholic school stuff. black pants and a plain shirt or something

  57. I agree dress codes are dumb, I live in Texas and on some days especially towards the end and the very beginning of school the two-inch rule on sleeves is ridiculous because it isn't weather appropriate it actually can cause heat exhaustion because of how hot it can get. Only one I agree with is no visible rebel battle flag seeing as I am in the south and some people feel it is offensive

  58. Personally I think dress codes defeat their own purpose… to make everyone stop bullying people because of how a student looks… well if you make everyone look the same, what YOU actually look like would be even more predominant than if you hide your looks with your clothes… or know that that sounds weird but it's true.

  59. I think dress codes do get out of hand sometimes. Having them doesn't eliminate gangs or bullies or anything like that. That all being said, there needs to be some sort of guidelines when it comes to appearance. Here's a dress code I would have:
    1. Nothing showing behinds, breasts, or crotches.
    2. Leggings must be worn with tops that cover the rear and crotch.
    3. Nothing gang related or with nudity/profanity on it.
    4. Piercings are allowed in moderation. Tattoos must be covered if they're vulgar. If piercings/tattoos/hair becomes a distraction, then the student will be asked to remove piercings, change hair, or cover tattoos.

  60. Where I live schools normally have uniforms, my school has just a t-shirt required but they have other clothing as well, professors commonly shame students for not wearing a uniform and say they just want attention. The dress code forbids mini-skirts only(nothing against mini shorts and nothing defines the length of a mini-skirt in the code, so I suppose that it depends on the school direction), but once I was wearing my everyday long skirt that doesn't show my knees and it got stuck on my backpack showing everything, I just noticed it when some girls told that to me, then the school inspector told me not to wear skirts anymore. I think the dress code should be wearing clothes.

  61. I HATE dress codes!! Once I got sent home from school because I wore shorts that were 2.5 inches above my knee instead of 3 I mean cant people just understand that it doesn't matter what I'm wearing it matters what I'm learning bc that is the whole point of going to school

  62. It is basically impossible to find clothing that fits my schools dress code without going to school looking like my grandmother

  63. I've never thought uniform or dress codes would be somehow related with violence at all.
    I've always studied in school that had uniform, I've always seen this as a way to make students equal.
    The school wouldn't be a catwalk anymore, you wouldn't recognize who's rich, who's poor, etc.
    At least I never had to mind "oh what will I wear tomorrow?" or "Does it looks nice for school?"
    I live in Brazil and, as far as I know, every school has uniform (public and private schools).
    It also helps staff, teachers, and inspectors identify if the student is from this or that school.

  64. I think that school dress codes, especially school uniforms, are a violation of students' rights and should be eliminated. At most, I would accept very basic rules connected to the most essential health and safety (regarding banning gang paraphernalia, I won't state a position here as to whether that should or should not be done, but even if we were to ban that very specific thing, there is no need to require an actual school uniform). There weren't any dress codes in the schools I went to and it didn't negatively affect our learning. How the adults of today have forgotten. In the early 1970s, it was normal, for example, for girls to go to school in skirts that covered little more than their behinds (and which tended to show your undies if you sat down and didn't cross your legs) and yet somehow…somehow…, the boys managed to get their schoolwork done, go to university and become constructive adults! Strict rules about dress in school are a needless restriction on personal rights and should stay in the 1960s.

  65. Kids should honesty wear what they want to wear. I hated my school's dress code. I hated that I couldn't wear tank tops and yoga pants or leggings. One time my friend got sent home for wearing a maxi dress. She's a very curvy girl and the dress really accentuated her bust and hips. Apparently it's a "distraction" to male students. So my friend had to miss a day of learning cause people's sons can't keep their eyes were it belongs. Interesting.

  66. Oh and one more thing. I got suspended for wearing a damn hat. It didn't have anything on it. It was a plain black beanie. I refused to take my hat off and got suspended. Way to go guys.

  67. My high school only allowed shorts for sports, and skirts had to touch the ground if you knelt down. They wouldn't even let you wear capri pants. I tried on time and was told I couldn't wear them. God forbid that a boy get distracted by my calves!

    By the way, I graduated high school in 2013.

  68. My high school's dress codes are more now for the idea of teaching students that they can't always wear what they want in a professional environment. I think of it more as a stepping stone towards work uniforms. It could pretty much be summarized by the fingertip length rule, no shoulders, no cleavage/belly, and no pajama pants. Essentially, it was cover from your shoulders to your fingertip length and wear nice pants in the winter.

  69. My school has no major dress code and the students are just fine. Our dress code is: nothing offensive, wear closed-toed shoes for science labs or tech ed, and no hats that block other people's vision. There are no problems with how students dress and when there is it is valid(like they can't go into the lab because they don't have proper footwear for example)

  70. My elementary school had no dress codes which made sense, there are less worries about that kind of stuff but right out of the gates in middle school there is basically and entire chapter of dress codes almost all for girls the only one that applied to all genders is "no hats or hoods" but all the rest were for girls such as: all sleeves must be wider than three fingers, pants must be longer than mid thigh and the finger tip length rule for skirts

  71. I'm from Luxemburg and most schools here have a dresscode like not wearing leggins with a short top or wearing short shorts, but most of the time no one really cares or they tell you to maybe wear something longer but no one will ever force you. The only thing that is often strictly banned are sweatpants bc for some reason they think guys will fight each other when they wear their certain sport group logos on their sweat pants?

  72. My school's dress code is "No boobs. No butts. No bellies," made by students. So no boobs, including super low cut tops or for guys, shirts that don't have super low cut armpit shirts. No showing your stomach for either gender, and no super low, saggy pants.

  73. I get very uncomfortable of the idea of school uniforms because some ppl do fantasize a young chick in a school uniform. :/

  74. I actually have an appointment tomorrow morning to talk to my principal to talk about our school dress code.

  75. I want to anonymously text my principle and explain to him that the government is paying for the public school. If how you dress is not illegal, it shouldn't be banned unless it had something to do with drugs sex or violence, in my opinion.

  76. I go to school in Florida and short shorts are not technically allowed (it's not enforced because it's hot all the time and the hallways are all outdoors) and you know sometimes I choose to wear the short shorts (not revealing, just not in dress code) and other times I may choose to wear jeans. and guess what school system. I focus and learn the exact same way in shorts as I do in jeans and in addition when I wear shorts I never catch boys staring at me because I'm showing my legs

  77. I actually like the school uniform idea. We didn't have it in my school . I thought it would be nice to not worry about what were every day.

  78. Dress codes seem to go to far. You shouldnt have to cover every inch of skin but you also shouldnt be allowed to have your ass hanging out of your shorts and half your cleavage popping out of your top. Overall dress codes are ridiculous and are insulting to both men and women. They tell women that it is their job to control men and it oversexualizes the female body. It tells men that they don't have self-control and they need to rely on the actions of women to be able to focus on their work.

    At my school, the dress code seems strict but the teachers rarely enforce the rules. Short shorts are okay as long as your ass is covered along with a small section of your thighs. Mid drift is allowed as long as it is not too much. Collarbones are allowed but you gotta keep at least 90% of that cleavage covered.

    The men do not stare and everyone is able to learn perfectly fine. Men may compliment a woman's appearance or comment about how nice a girl's legs or ass looks in their shorts but it doesn't disrupt learning and the women are happy to take the compliments.

  79. I'll never forget this one time when our vice principal was reprimanding the school over the loud speaker about the dress code and legitimately said, "We're not some urban school. We're better than that." I just remember turning to the girl next to me and sarcastically saying, "Yea, we're not black, we're better than that." There were quite a few people that made a stink over how racist that comment was, but, of course, he never got punished over it.

  80. I go to a small alternative school. We have no dress code. All it states in the student handbook is be smart don't wear anything that will get you arrested out in public.

  81. It used to be everyone dress similar to be able to identify gang activity, now it's all keep girls from exposing any part of our skin. The main excuse being we distract guys… the way we dress doesn't distract our classmates, you have to consider the fact that we are being sexualized and discriminated by the adults on our school campuses. If a teacher points out that your outfit is distracting it must be because they were distracted by what your wearing.

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