Smart textiles help saving energy equivalent to more than three nuclear power plants!

Smart textiles help saving energy equivalent to more than three nuclear power plants!


Smart textiles that purify water or regulate temperature, TEKO, the Swedish Textile and Clothing Industries Association, is no stranger to challenge and change. Their stated goal is to reap environmental benefits in all product development. We work with environmental issues in many different ways. From being a side issue ten years ago, it is now a key issue for Swedish companies. The industry’s ambition to develop new, environmentally efficient textile products has a great potential – not least of which in the domain of technical fabrics. We are in Kinna, in Sjuhäradsbygden – you could say Sweden’s textile cradle, which has produced fabrics for the past 127 years One of today’s most progressive players in the industry is the family business Ludvig Svensson. Here, they produce world-renowned climate-steering technical textiles. Their climate fabrics are used in industrial greenhouses to let in or reflect light and heat as needed. This is an energy-efficient measure that drastically reduces the need for heating and fans. We have about 20,000 hectares out of our climate screens deployed around the world saving an estimated energy production equivalent to three or four nuclear power plants per year. So that’s a decent contribution to reducing our carbon footprint in the world. In addition to the focus on industrial greenhouses, the company works with home furnishings and textiles. And we find their weaves in many public places. As here, at Simonsland in Borås, a meeting place for creative businesses in fashion, textile and design. Among them is Smart Textiles, a research center for the development and production of smart textiles Above all, we want to find new inventions in textiles. As with anything else, the imagination is the limit for what you can do. Smart Textiles is part of the School of Textiles which helps drive the development of environmental issues in the industry. What has happened in the last two or three years, you might say, is that the major fashion, textile and shoe companies have gotten together and taken a common approach to environmental issues. The goal of this work is to communicate the environmental impact of a garment to the consumer, so that on the receipt, on a label, via your smartphone or other communication medium one should be able to find out how much, or how good the garment is from an environmental and social point of view. And to reduce the environmental impact of its production is something that even Ludvig Svensson works with. Despite age-old methods, the company’s sights have always been set on a sustainable future. Yes, we have always worked very proactively on environmental issues and it has been the main focus of the company. In the 70s we started a partnership with the County Council and the trade association for TEKO and even our competitors where we looked at environmental issues, drove them forward. Being proactive and collaboration that is something we believe in. For the textile industry, this represents two challenges for the future. Firstly to reduce their own environmental impact, but also to participate and contribute to reduced emissions through new innovations. I certainly believe that there may be more, what we call “niche applications” where you will be able to use textiles in the future to reduce environmental burdens. But we are not finished developing the functionality of our own fabrics. Our best contribution is to continue developing greenhouse fabrics to save an additional one percent more energy. This is the best way we can contribute to making a better world.

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