The Unique Stories Behind ROC’s Garment Industry And Area Youth Take On Racism

The Unique Stories Behind ROC’s Garment Industry And Area Youth Take On Racism


COMING UP ON NEED TO KNOW…WHEN YOU THINK
OF ROCHESTER AND ITS CONTRIBUTIONS LOCALLY AND NATIONALLY, YOU LIKELY THINK OF FREDERICK
DOUGLASS AND SUSAN B. ANTHONY, GEORGE EASTMAN AND KODAK. AND FOR SOME, PERHAPS EVEN THAT
ROCHESTER DELICACY KNOWN AS A GARBAGE PLATE. BUT DID YOU EVER THINK OF IT AS A FASHION
DESTINATION? THE STORY OF ROCHESTER’S ONCE RENOWNED GARMENT INDUSTRY… JUST AHEAD. ALSO
ON THE SHOW, THERE’S BEEN QUITE A BIT OF MOMENTUM WITH OUR COMMUNITY’S EFFORTS TO
NOT ONLY ADDRESS RACISM, BUT TO ALSO HELP ELIMINATE IT. HOW YOUNG PEOPLE ARE MAKING
‘SOCIAL JUSTICE’ MORE THAN A CONVERSATION. IT’S ALL COMING UP RIGHT NOW ON NEED TO
KNOW. ((RECORDED OPEN)) WHEN YOU THINK OF POPULAR FASHION AND CLOTHING
DESTINATIONS IN THE U-S, NEW YORK CITY LIKELY COMES TO MIND FIRST. BUT DID YOU KNOW THERE
WAS A TIME WHEN ROCHESTER WAS ALSO RENOWNED FOR ITS CLOTHING AND TEXTILE INDUSTRY? THE
UNIQUE STORY OF OUR LOCAL GARMENT INDUSTRY IS THE FOCUS OF A W-X-X-I DOCUMENTARY PREMIERING
NEXT WEEK ON W-X-X-I TELEVISION. HERE’S A SNEAK PEEK OF THE DOCUMENTARY “TAILOR
MADE.”…. (Narrator) From Rochester’s earliest days,
much of its character has been defined by immigrants seeking a better life. (MUSIC) (Louise Slaughter) Every summer here, we are
blessed with all of the festivals from the different ethnicities that we have. And if
you really look back at the history of why they’re here and how they came to be here
to enrich this community as they have, a lot of that had to do with the garment industry. (Duffy Hickey) My great-grandfather emigrated
from Limerick, Ireland in the 1850s. He was a tailor (Narrator) Small tailoring shops paved the
way for large clothing factories that continued to bring in talent from other lands. (Christine Ridarsky) We have a large population:
Germans, Russians, Poles who can trace their roots. When you get to the first half of the
Twentieth Century, you start seeing a lot of Italians being recruited. (Walter Piccone) When my family came to the
U.S., their primary destination was Rochester, New York. They knew Hickey-Freeman was hiring
Italian tailors. (Gerry Esposito) I’m proud that my dad and
my mom to a certain extent was a part of this legacy. That it contributed to the success
of Rochester as a city. (John Lidestri) There was a lot of support
systems within the community and the opportunity to start our American dream. (Narrator) But, in the Nineteenth Century,
those first immigrants didn’t always find a dream. They had to fight against unhealthy,
even dangerous factory conditions. There were protests, strikes,
and one violent death. In the end, they forged an industry that would become a proud and
dominant presence in the local economy. And it didn’t stop there. Behind a celebrated
motto “Rochester Made Means Quality,” the city gained nationwide attention in the
clothing business. (Karen Pastorello) By 1920, the Rochester
garment industry is the second largest employer in the city ranking only behind the Eastman
Kodak Company in terms of numbers of employees. And nationally it is number four in terms
of production of men’s clothing behind New York City, Chicago and Philadelphia. (Narrator) It was a success built on dedicated
work ethics brought to our city by craftsmen fleeing from countries torn apart by poverty,
war and political oppression. Once here, workers found employment—often before they learned
to speak English—so they could feed and clothe their families. (Thomas Golisano) My mother worked at Hickey
Freeman it was very important to the family because it was part of carrying the family
load. (Narrator) Even though the glory of that industry
has faded to some degree, it has left a lasting legacy, producing the civic, political and
philanthropic leaders of today. (John Diacato) Those children became really
leaders of the community. They became very important parts of our community. (Narrator) How that came about is a dramatic
story that is woven through the social and economic fabric of the city. As we look back
over its two hundred year history, it becomes clear that Rochester was—from its earliest
days—tailor made for the garment industry. (HELENE) THE STORY OF ROCHESTER’S GARMENT
INDUSTRY IS A STORY OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP, INNOVATION, IMMIGRATION, WORKERS RIGHTS, AND MORE. AND
IT’S A STORY THAT CAN’T BE TOLD WITHOUT ACKNOWLEDGING THE PROFOUND ROLE OF WOMEN IN
ROCHESTER’S CLOTHING AND TEXTILE INDUSTRY. JOINING ME TO DISCUSS THE INFLUENCE OF THAT
ROLE AND HOW IT HAS TRANSITIONED FROM THE EARLY-TO-MID-1800S TO TODAY IS: DEBORAH HUGHES
– EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE NATIONAL SUSAN B. ANTHONY MUSEUM AND HOUSE, CHRISTINE RIDARSKY
– ROCHESTER HISTORIAN AND HISTORICAL SERVICES CONSULTANT, AND NITA BROWN – OWNER AND FASHION
DESIGNER FOR THE GHANAIAN-INSPIRED DESIGN HOUSE, MANSA-WEAR. Welcome to all of you,
thank you for being here. (ALL) Thank you. (HELENE) So with the birth of the garment
industry in Rochester in the early to mid-1800s, what did that role look like early on? I’ll
give this to you, Christine. What were their contributions? I’m curious if this was a
time of opportunity for them, or were there contributions overlooked? (CHRISTINE RIDARSKY) Well certainly in the
early period, a lot of that work was happening inside the household or in sweat shops. So,
women were very invisible within the field at that point in time. Their conditions could
be very harsh. Working late at night, being paid for piece work – so only being paid
of the amount of work they had accomplished. The amount of work that met the standards
of the employers who were employing them. But there were some women who made a significant
contribution. Elizabeth Baker comes to mind. She had created an early pattern to make tailoring
much more efficient and easier to do. That would make a tremendous impact on our community. (HELENE) How did that influence the garment
industry – that standardized pattern that she created? (RIDARSKY) It had a tremendous influence in
that you could produce clothing more quickly, sizes could be standardized so it made it
easier to get clothing out to the community. And you particularly start to see the effects
during the Civil War when there was a need to clothe the soldiers and get clothing quickly
and get it to the front lines. So at that point of time ,you have not only the standardization
of clothing, but you have the influence of the sewing machine coming into effect too,
which has a huge impact upon women. (HELENE) Let’s talk about that. The sewing
machine brought about a significant change, and social change as well. So if we can kind
of dig into that just a little bit. Describe just what that change looked like. I’ll
give that to you Deborah. (DEBORAH HUGHES) A background about why Rochester
was so prime is you had to have electricity, or else you were hand pumping. So from the
weaving to the machines – because we had power from the river, we had the potential
to establish small factories. The looms were a critical piece behind the garment industry,
being able to manufacture the textiles also. Susan B. Anthony was kind of ‘tailor-made’
because her family was in the textile production industry since she was a small child. At that
point, a single woman couldn’t be employed. Actually in Susan B. Anthony’s home – when
she was a child – they would have the workers living with them. So her mother would make
not only breakfast, lunch and dinner for the seven children, but also for the eight or
nine people – women – who were employed at the mill. And so then we jump up to the
time we’ve got now. We’ve got machines – needles are being manufactured, and you
have the potential to do mass production but also the potential to have huge problems with
the conditions for children and employees who are working ten, twelve, fourteen hour
days. (HELENE) I’d love for you to just go in
a little bit in terms of the many roles of Susan B. Anthony. She did have a profound
impact in terms of women’s rights in the garment industry. If you could kind of jus
touch on that a little bit. (HUGHES) She actually worked when she was
about twelve years old. She had an opportunity to work as a spooler in her father’s mill
back in Batenville, NY. So she had a connection with what was involved in the industry. One
of the problems for people who were working in the mills was the lint. Tuberculosis was
a problem. She lost two sisters to tuberculosis. Although that was a contagious disease, you
were more vulnerable to it if you were in a bad working condition. So during her whole
life, Susan B. Anthony had the sensitivity and understanding of the industry. Her father
actually ended up going bankrupt in the big crash of ’37. So she understood a lot about
labor. We’re not surprised that in the 1860s when she’s publishing the revolution magazine.
She’s saying ‘equal work!’, ‘join the union, ladies!’ and really pushing hard
and helping to start an organization called the Working Women’s Central Association
so that women could have a voice and could advocate for better working conditions. She
was an advocate for the eight hour day when it was still a fourteen hour day. (HELENE) Wow. Well Nita, I think of you as
a perfect example of the role of how women have changed. That role has changed significantly
from then to today. In Rochester’s garment industry we did see a decline during the Great
Depression and there was this point in time when there were five main factories referred
to as the ‘big 5.’ Only one exists today, that’s Hickey Freeman. I want to know, Nita,
as we look then and take a glance at where things stand now, how would you define the
role of women in the clothing industry today? (NITA BROWN) I think we women now set the
tone. For instance, not only do I designs I actually set the fabrics that I am going
to use to do it then I go back and then tell my tailors and my seamstress this is what
I want. So in that sense, I think I become the fashion trend; I set the trend and then
I do the production and it comes back. And so, when I look at it I also get.. I think
now I have more freedom; I can dictate more what my hours are, what I do, more than a
hundred, two hundred years ago you were being dictated to. But also as a woman, I can see
when I place my orders and my production orders I can also see the impact although it’s
in Ghana, they are producing in Ghana, I can basically choose who I want, so I tend to
use women factories to do my work a lot. And it can truly benefit them. (Helene) Well the fabric of the immigrant
story is also a piece of Rochester’s clothing industry and again another example of that,
how do we see that type of, the interest in, I mean you came to the US to Rochester from
Ghana when you were a teenager, and then you have an interesting story in terms of how
that background and that ethnic influence people are saying to you, essentially, we
want what you have, you know, your style, we want it here, we want to see that influence
here. (Brown) Right. (Helene) How would you describe, I guess,
do you feel as though it’s that what you are bringing to the table is so much more
appreciated now in terms of that cultural influence on the clothing industry versus
then? (Brown) I think so. I think it’s not only
because it’s different or the colors are bright or they’re brilliant but I also think
because there’s a quality. Right. I’m wearing stuff that my mother used to wear
fifty years ago. I mean, this particular jacket I’m wearing, I can throw it into the washing
machine and it comes out just as it is. So I think that, with the combination of taking
something from the quote un-quote Old Country and mashing it up with what we have here makes
a very different and unique. But, at the same time, makes it part of the Rochester story.
Right, which is what the bare lines of it, so it doesn’t, you know, here I am, coming
in from Ghana by ways of Kodak, and then, you know, women in Rochester say, ‘we like
the way you dress; we like the way you look. Why don’t you sell it? Why don’t you decide
to, you know, manufacture and present what you have?’ (Helene) One thing I want to touch upon was
an interesting soundbite from Congresswoman Louise Slaughter, and she said she considered
herself to be Hickey-Freeman’s Washington office. And she said, “the only thing, I’m
the only woman representing this area and I can’t wear a Hickey-Freeman suit because
they don’t design for women!” And I want to know, there’s so much talk about men’s
production, Rochester’s ranked 4th in the 1920s in terms of men’s production in the
US, why so much emphasis on the production of male clothing more so than female clothing
and when we look at our history? (Ridarsky) I think part of it has to do with
the role that women were playing in the community in that a lot of women were sewing in the
home for themselves and their families, and so the popularity of the men’s clothing
industry really was to suit the men going going out into the business world. So, that
was part of it. But Rochester, it did grow up, the men’s
industry grew up, but interestingly we had a large shoe industry as well and the shoes
we manufactured here were primarily for women. So, you know, women weren’t entirely neglected
in Rochester in terms of their clothing needs. (Helene) Well very interesting conversation.
I appreciate you being here. A SPECIAL THANK YOU TO MY GUESTS: NITA BROWN,
CHRISTINE RIDARSKY AND DEBORAH HUGHES. YOU CAN CATCH THEM IN THE PREMIER OF W-X-X-I’S
“TAILOR MADE” ON MONDAY, FEBRUARY 29TH AT 8 P-M.
— THERE’S AN ASPECT OF OUR COMMUNITY’S RICH
HISTORY IN THE CLOTHING INDUSTRY THAT CONTINUES TO EXIST TODAY. I’M TALKING ABOUT THE LEGACY
OF THE CRAFTSPEOPLE WHO CAME TO ROCHESTER FROM AROUND THE WORLD TO WORK FOR SOME OF
THE TOP FACTORIES LIKE HICKEY FREEMAN AND FASHION PARK, AND EVENTUALLY LAUNCHED CUSTOM
CLOTHING SHOPS OF THEIR OWN. SHOPS LIKE ADRIAN JULES CUSTOM CLOTHIERS THAT’S
BEEN KNOWN FOR DESIGNING AND CRAFTING EYE-CATCHING SUITS FOR PRO ATHLETES AND OTHER BIG NAMES.
JOINING ME TO SHARE THE SECRET OF LONGEVITY AFTER THE DECLINE OF ROCHESTER’S GARMENT
INDUSTRY IS PETER ROBERTI – PRESIDENT OF RETAIL FOR ADRIAN JULES CUSTOM CLOTHIERS. IT’S
GREAT TO HAVE YOU HERE. (Helene) It’s great to have you on the program. (Peter) Great to be here, great to be here,
thank you. (Helene) Okay, so Rochester has lost its standing,
as being the leading figure in the garment industry, but there are stories like that
of your father. These stories demonstrate, the longevity and that success, not just locally,
but also nationally. Your father emigrated here in the 1940s, 50s,
first started working at Hickey-Freeman for the past ten years, and then opened the Adrian
Jules, custom clothiers in ’64. And I’m curious to know, what did he tell you, about
the importance of quality? He told you that—that motto, ‘Rochester Means Quality.’ How
did he see that, how did he connect to that in his work? (Peter) You know, it started with, you know,
it started in Italy, he had his own shop in Italy, he came over here in Rochester, and
then came here, and decided that, ‘If I’m gonna do something, I’m gonna do it for
myself.’ He had a dream, and he had a vision, and a
legacy, and, uh, my father, he involved his partner, Julio, and said, you know, ‘We
gotta build a real quality garment.’ After the first year of business, his accountant
said: ‘You’re better off going to where you were.’ You’re not making—you’re
making 18 dollars, you’re not making any money. And he goes, you know what that means?
You gotta work a little harder, and you gotta produce a custom garment, and then the craftsmanship
of the people you got in our places can make everything the way it is a superior garment
in the industry, so that people can appreciate. People always pay for quality, you know? They—they
don’t always want to pay for it the first time, but once you tell it and explain to
them what the quality is in the long run, then it just feels better and it looks better
on them. (Helene): So for—for over 50 years you’ve
been—you’re company has been known for—these custom-made, hi-quality suits, and they are
not cheap. They are gorgeous but also expensive, and I-I wanna know, what’s first, tell me
the secret to longevity? How have you made it through the decline of the Big Five? We’ve
got Hickey-Freeman left. And I also have read that there’s been a decline in custom clothiers
in the U.S.? (Peter) You know, the decline in clothiers
in the U.S. is really probably more clothiers, less makers of clothing. So you know, that’s
a worse, we’re part of the ones, there are only a few of what we do, and we’re one
of the few in the United States, and we’re part of them, and a lot of its research and
development. And we’ve got a team over on Ridge Road. You know my brother’s over there,
my sister’s over there. You know, I got my niece and my nephew over there. And my
son is with us, and it’s—it’s a team, and we believe the team helps to create this
research and development and find out what—what the consumer wants and what they need. And—and the quality might be more expensive
in the beginning, but it will last longer. And so in reality it’s a less expensive
garment because it always looks good on you. And you know, your first impressions, before
you say anything, people judge you, before you say anything, and so it’s really about
how you look and how you appear. (Helene) So in terms of that, the research
that your team has done. Would you say that—that you have found at times a need to adapt, to
changing social, fashion trends of the times? (Peter) Yes, as I said, just for the past
seven or eight years, it’s really seen that you’ve got a lot more trimmer garment, a
little more fitted garment, shorter garment, but it’s gotta be wearable. So you see a
lot of real tight garments, a lot of guys really don’t want it. They want something
more trim and more youthful, something more svelte. So we’ve spent hundreds of hours
on our garment, to come up with a garment that has to look and feel proper silhouetted
to a gentleman. Looks good in it, looks more youthful, looks younger, and feels better
in it. So, that real baggy garment of the 80s, you just don’t see anymore. And guys
aren’t wearing it anymore. You know, and—and the trends are, the fashion
trends we sort of stay away from the real extremes, ‘cause our client is investing
a good amount of money in their clothing, and it doesn’t matter if he’s 20 years
old to 60 years old, he’s gonna want something that’s gonna last and look good and—and
be presentable in. I had a conversation with a tailor recently who said: ‘You know. Over the last few decades, we’ve seen this
‘business casual’ has sort of changed so much, and what clients are asking for.’
Have you found that—that men are not dressing up as much as they did before? Or, are you—would
you say not so much? (Peter) Well, you know what, in the 80s, you
had what was real casual. Guys wore flip-flops, t-shirts, sandals, the dot-com, and whatnot.
And now we’ve seen a change in…in the lifestyles of what people want, between actors,
movies, uh, P. Diddy, uh, uh, Pitbull, all of these gentlemen are getting dressed up,
and we’re finding that guys really do appreciate and want to wear nicer clothes, because it’s
something different, because sometimes their fathers really weren’t dressed up, but you
got younger guys that are dressing up, and they want something that’s handmade, it’s
tailor-made, it’s made for them, and instead of going out and purchasing your Ferrari,
that’s custom-made just for you, they can get custom-made clothes and pick out the liners
and the details, and the silhouette that best complements their body and hides a lot of
their flaws. (Helene) So what—what goes into making…a
high-quality suit? What is key? And so for someone who—who is looking for something,
what should they be looking for? (Helene) In reality, you know, when you see
a nice fabric, and a nice line, it’s really what you don’t see. It’s the foundation
of the garment, it’s the inside of the garment, it’s the inside of the gar—it’s the
from the canvas to the tapes, to the—to the cotton, to the shoulder pad, to the—to
the lining in the—in the shoulder area. These are all the proper garments that are
made in certain ways. So when it’s constructed, it’s molded to your body. And the more you
wear it, the more you mold it to your body, and the more it feels better on you. So when
you first get it, you know, it’s a piece of fabric. And then we make it into a three-dimensional
garment, and then it molds to your body, it feels better, and so then when it’s done,
you know, we’re one of the few in the United States, and you know, we’re an American-based
company. So it’s big that it’s made in the U.S.A., you know, we have 80 to 100 that
are native to Rochester, who are really proud of putting this garment together. You know,
so the hand workmanship, the hand-stitching, the hand button holes, you know, that’s
all important to what we believe, to our clients, so that they get a better value, and a better
garment, in—in a marketplace, you know, a garment that’s really made for you, feels
better, looks better, and, it’s the little things that makes it look better on you. And
in—and in—in if you do a quality garment, that’s the important thing, and a lot of
guys are getting garments made overseas, and that’s fine, but the people who really want
a quality handmade, hand-tailored garment, they know there’s a difference, and you
can feel it in your hand. The fully-canvas garment is a little softer in your hand, when
you feel it, it just molds to your body. (Helene) Peter Roberti, it’s just a pleasure
having you here. PETER ROBERTI – THANK YOU FOR JOINING ME FOR
THIS DISCUSSION. YOU CAN LEARN MORE ABOUT THE ADRIAN JULES STORY ON W-X-X-I’S “TAILOR
MADE” DOCUMENTARY. AGAIN – THAT’S PREMIERING AT 8 P-M ON MONDAY, FEBRUARY 29TH ON W-X-X-I
TELEVISION. —
ROCHESTER HAS GENERATED SOME MOMENTUM OVER THE PAST FEW YEARS IN ITS EFFORTS TO CREATE
TOLERANCE AND UNDERSTANDING IN OUR COMMUNITY WHEN IT COMES TO ISSUES OF RACE. THE RACIAL
EQUITY INITIATIVE, FACING RACE, EMBRACING EQUITY, HAS WORKED TO HELP GENERATE CONVERSATIONS
ABOUT RACISM THROUGH A SERIES OF FILM SCREENINGS AND DIALOGUES IN AREA SCHOOLS. WILMA CAMPBELL, PART OF THE YOUTH LEADERSHIP
COMMITTEE FOR FACING RACE, EMBRACING EQUITY IS CREDITED FOR BRINGING THE DOCUMENTARY “I’M
NOT RACIST…AM I?” TO ROCHESTER AREA HIGH SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES. HERE’S WHAT SHE HAD
TO SAY ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF INCORPORATING YOUNG PEOPLE IN THE DISCUSSION…. If we don’t begin to engage our young people
as early as possible in the conversation about race and how that affects our daily lives,
then we don’t have as much chance of getting to the dream that is the American dream which
is a society in which there is equity, regardless of race, creed color. FOR DISTRICTS THAT RESPONDED, SUCH AS WEST
IRONDEQUOIT, THE CONVERSATIONS DIDN’T STOP AFTER THE SCREENINGS. TODAY, WE’RE HIGHLIGHTING
THE PROGRESS OF THIS COLLECTIVE WORK, INVOLVING ROCHESTER YOUTH IN PARTICULAR. IT’S ALL
PART OF OUR AMERICAN GRADUATE CHAMPION SERIES. TAKE A LOOK… (HELENE) It’s a scene you don’t see every
day in school. Students from throughout Monroe County all gather together to talk about one
thing: race. It’s called the Student Summit on Race. The event was hosted at West Irondequoit
High School. (JEFF CRANE) To be able to give them the opportunity
to show us adults that they’re going to take this conversation further, that they
are going to – and I believe this – that this next generation has a better concept than
some of us around basic human dignity and mutual respect for all human beings, and for
me that’s the basis of our work. (HELENE) During a recent Need to Know taping,
West Irondequoit Superintendent, Jeff Crane, said after a Facing Race, Embracing Equity
film screening and discussion on race in his district – authentic conversations on the
subject had to continue. So he invited the St. Louis-based project, Gateway-2-Change,
and its student leaders to assist. He also sent an open invitation to students from all
Monroe County school districts. (SHANE FILER) There’s a sense of apathy, you
know, oh racism’s been a problem for so long, I can’t do anything about it, why am I here?
What am I doing? I’m just doing this to get out of class. No. I don’t. No. You can do
something Who’s going to be in charge in 10 years, seriously who? It’s us? (HELENE) Gateway-2-Change launched after the
death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. The group travels the country working to empower
fellow peers to become positive change agents in their communities. (GINA DIPAOLO) I personally care so much about
social justice and it’s something I just like to talk about in every single conversation
I can. But usually every single person I talk to is not really open to talk in just a regular
social setting, but when we create an environment that’s structured that has certain guidelines/rules
of respect, then they are open to talk about issues of race. (HELENE) The goal of the summit was to deepen
student understanding of race relations in Rochester. Students examined problems that
exist and proposed solutions to make change. (FILER) …it’s an extermination of ignorance.
Not extermination on ignorance, but an assault on ignorance. ‘Cause it’s not really a problem
of bigotry any more, it’s a problem of ignorance. Bigotry was a problem of the old generation,
ignorance is ours. IRONDEQUOIT HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR, GINA DIPAOLO,
TELLS ME ALL THE SCHOOLS REPRESENTED AT THE STUDENT SUMMIT ON RACE ARE CURRENTLY WORKING
ON THEIR CHANGE AGENT PROJECTS. HER SCHOOL IS IN THE PROCESS OF LAUNCHING AN INTERACTIVE,
MULTI-MEDIA STYLE BLOG, RUN SOLELY BY STUDENTS, BUT TARGETING ALL AGE DEMOGRAPHICS IN ROCHESTER,
AS IT ADDRESSES THE COMPLEXITIES OF RACE AND RACISM. SHE ALSO SAYS THAT STUDENT REPS FROM
THE RACE SUMMIT ARE PLANNING TO RECONVENE IN EARLY SPRING TO SHARE UPDATES AND PROGRESS
ON THEIR WORK. THIS SEGMENT WAS PART OF OUR ONGOING “NEED
TO KNOW” SERIES CALLED: “AMERICAN GRADUATE CHAMPIONS.” WE’RE HIGHLIGHTING INDIVIDUALS
AND ORGANIZATIONS HELPING AREA KIDS SUCCEED ON THE JOURNEY FROM PRE-SCHOOL TO GRADUATION.
TO LEARN MORE GO TO: W-X-X-I-DOT-ORG-SLASH-GRAD. —
AND THAT’S IT FOR THIS EDITION OF NEED TO KNOW. I’M HELENE BIANDUDI HOFER. THANK YOU
FOR JOINING ME TONIGHT AND THROUGHOUT THE WEEKEND RIGHT HERE ON HERE WXXI-TV. I’LL
SEE YOU NEXT WEEK.

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