Webinar 20190220 Using E Textiles in the classroom

Webinar 20190220 Using E Textiles in the classroom


MELISSA: Get that
started right now so that those who are not
able to attend live can listen to this
great information later. And we share that
information out on CS for All Teachers website. But we are being
led tonight by one of our community ambassadors,
Nicole Reitz-Larsen. And she is going to be the host
with the most this evening. And she’s got two
wonderful panelists that’s going to share, including
another of our community ambassadors, Pam. So we’re happy to have
all three of them here, as well as those of you that
are joining us as participants. So without further
ado, I’m going to mute myself and let
Nicole take things from here. Thanks, everyone. NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN:
Thank you, Melissa, for getting it started. So I am super excited to
have two ladies on tonight, Deborah Field and Pamela. We are going to be
talking about E-textiles. So Deborah is a professor
at Utah State University. She is a book author
and curriculum writer for the ECS unit
six E-textiles, which is super exciting. Because that’s a new
thing in version 8 of ECS. And Pamela is a high
school teacher out of LA. She is also a
community ambassador. She teaches Exploring Computer
Science and the AP Computer Science Principles. So we have both
ladies on tonight talking to us about E-textiles. I’m excited to hear
from both of them about how it’s been
going in the classroom and how students are
engaged with this curriculum and the E-textiles. Just thinking about all
these students and all these little things
all of the classroom gets me a little nervous. So I’m excited to hear
from their expertise. So it’s going to be super fun. I am a high school teacher
in Salt Lake City, Utah. I teach ECS and Computer
Science Principle. And so I will, hopefully, be
able to get enough funding to do the E-textiles
unit next year. I’m looking forward to hearing
some ideas from Pam and Deborah on how to get things started. So first thing we
have is a poll. So if you would like to
bring the poll up, Melissa, that would be great. So for those of us who have
joined, if you have ever had students create anything
with E-textile projects, we would love to hear. I think it’s always
great to find out a little bit about the
folks on the webinars that we can kind of
tailor our topics to your conversations
of what you’re doing, what you’ve tried. And it looks like we’ve
got some who have tried, some who have not yet tried. I know that I have
tried it myself but not with students yet. So it looks like we’ve got
85% that it’s looking new for. So that gives us
a good idea of how to tailor our conversations. So Melissa, if you want
to bring back the slides, we will go from there. I’m sure we’ll get more people
to join us as we go through. So we will get started. For those of you that
are familiar with the ECS curriculum– that Exploring
Computer Science curriculum– it’s made it to work with
students at the high school level. There are six units
and inversions one through six, seven. That last unit Exploring
Computer Science was a robotics unit. And in version 8 that
just came out this summer, we have the E-textile unit. So as we think about
exploring computer science and how they use the
curriculum, a lot of it ties on three strands. One of those strands
being equity. How do we make it
so that all students are engaged in our classes? How do we teach with inquiry
to get students wanting to know those computer
science concepts that we’re teaching them? And then what are those
topics that we want them to get by the end of the day? And so one of the things I
love about as far Exploring Computer Science is
that my students used to want the vocabulary
words, and tell me recipes step-by-step
what to do to get my A. And once they came into
my class, they were like, oh, you’re not going to tell
us what to do to get the A. No, I’m not. But what we’re
going to do is we’re going to get you excited
about the topics. And we’re going to do
activities in groups to engage you so that
then we can tell you what it is that you just did. So I think a lot of things that
we want to make connections with as we’re thinking
about computer science is problem solving. How is it that we use
technology for creating themes to have fun, or to show off? How do we use problem solving
to make those things happen? And how do we design
that– storyboard– it? And then how do we bring
programming into that? There’s got to be some thought
process on what we want to do. And then a lot of the
planning and persistence– sometimes you make a plan
and it doesn’t always work. So how do we continue and
have fun with projects that are engaging? The curriculum you
can download for free. We’ve got a link here,
http://www.exploringcs.org/e textiles. And Deborah can tell
us a little bit more about that as we get going. But I wanted you to know that it
is part of a whole curriculum. So if you pick up the
curriculum and you’re like, oh, this doesn’t tell me how to
do things how I’m traditionally used to, Deborah’s our expert. She can help us out. But know that it’s part of
a bigger curriculum set. So I’m going to turn
the time over to Deborah to hear a little bit
about the curriculum and how she got involved
with this awesome project. DEBORAH FIELD: So we’ve been
working on this curriculum for several years. We worked on it with
some LA schools and– by the way, I’m in a cafe, so
if you hear noise that’s why. And this is the culmination
of about eight years of work with E-textiles. So we’ve been
developing activities for electronic
textiles, particularly in computer science
contexts for a while. And we felt that it was
time to try to formalize it and then worked with Joanna
Good and Zane Margolis from ECS to try to– it seemed like a good fit
for another unit in ECS. So we had a number of goals. We wanted to make sure
the learning was rigorous. That it wasn’t
just a QC project. So there’s a lot of challenging
learning in this unit, particularly with some
conditional statements of us using multiple conditional
statements or embedded one, and then with using
sensors– so input and output and those sorts of things. And yet we also wanted
it to be personal, and we find that
E-textiles are just so right for personal engagement. Particularly if you start
with what kids want to make– when you really forward
the aesthetic choices first, and then you follow
with how to actually do it. And we wanted to see if we
could do it with one teacher. We’ve had a lot of success
with that, although it’s not necessarily easy. And then, of course,
we want to make sure that all students are engaged. And one of the fun things
about electronic textiles is a lot of teachers have
commented to us that it levels the expertise in the class. So instead of having
a few students maybe for whom some abstract
ideas or code comes really naturally, all of
a sudden they’re just one of a type of expertise. There’s other kids. You bring in more artistry
or crafting experience, or who just take
the electronics, or who code in different ways. So it’s really fun
for those aspects. I’m going to be
really brief here so that we can try to
curtail this to your question and then get to some of Pam’s
experience with teaching this. But we have four
projects in the unit. So it’s a very
project-focused unit. The idea is that by creating
these really fun projects, the kids will learn as they go. So coding is not the
object it’s simply a means to creating these
really neat projects. And we designed
them so that kids need to learn certain
skills in order to accomplish their goals. Four projects, they’re
set up really simple. A paper circuit as
a short project. It helps get people started
with foregrounding the student’s designs and then learning
with the simple circuit. Get some use of some
of the electronics. And also just steps in
completing a project. So that’s another big part
of the unit and debugging. And then the wristband
takes a little bit longer. And so three lights in parallel. We are learning some slightly
more sophisticated circuitry. There is room for
a lot of aesthetics but it’s still limited
with just a little band around your wrist. So we try to give more choices
as the project continues so as not to overwhelm the kids. And then what we do is we
start some basic coding at the end of the wristband so
that the kids are essentially coding their wristbands. Because, OK, the
lights turned on. It’s really fun but
it’s really natural to want to make
those lights blink and do different patterns. So we use the wristbands
to start doing that. And then we have a
collaborative project because ECS is all
about collaboration. And this uses two switches. So if you have two switches
you can have four conditions. We start with this [INAUDIBLE]
using a basic condition. So if I do the
switch where maybe I want the lights to
blink in one pattern. If I switch it, have the lights
blinking another pattern. It works in pairs. And we have the
students split up the test between
the crafting part and the circuitry and their
coding part and then switch. But everyone is getting
opportunities to do both. There’s a structured
collaboration. And it’s also collaborative
for the class. The idea is that each group
is making like a quilt square. And so you can see. So the class chooses the theme
and they come all together. So we’ve had a lot
of different themes from movies, to PAC-MAN,
to boxing your locale and those sorts of things. In the final project we go
back to an individual project. So by this time
everyone has experience making circuits and sewing. And they’re pretty
comfortable with that. They also have
experience coding, although they’ve only had one
project where they’re really seriously coding. So the human sensor project
is a nice culminating project. It takes a little bit longer
and we have handmade sensors made with aluminum foil. So you squeeze it, and then
you use those squeezes– the computer reads basically how
hard you’re squeezing or more in reality, like how
much electricity you’re conducting between your two
hands, and use that to– so that’s your input. And so it was really fun. One of the things
that I think really works really well
about E-textiles is it takes abstracting circuit
code and they’re very concrete. They’re physically embodied. So when you’re making
sequences of light you can see if your
lighting patterns work. Similarly, with the
sensor, we really wanted to handmade
sensor for the kids to see the correlation
between squeezing and seeing these numbers on the screen. And then they have to
decide how they want people to act and try to trigger that. And this is where we find
that the students really start debugging their
sensors for end-user stuff. So that you get into the, this
is intended for someone else to use as well as yourself. You have to maybe compare. Different people have
different readings. And it’s really neat because
it also allows everyone to do the same project. In essence, you’re teaching the
same concepts, the same ideas. But everyone’s project is unique
because the sensors, based on how big they are,
what stage they are, how they’re
connected, they’re all going to get different readings. So it’s a way to
keep something common but yet have this really
personally tangible thing. So and I’m going to hand it
back off to Nicole I think. NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN:
Yeah, so I’m curious, Pam, what
kind of projects you’ve tried with your students. Deborah talked a little
bit about the squares, and the band, and the sensors. What have you
tried in your class and what age group
are you working with? Oh, you’re muted. PAMELA: Sorry, I’m a ninth
through twelfth grade teacher. And last year– this is my
second year doing E-textiles. And I did it last year
with ninth graders. And at first, it was a
little difficult because– especially with the boys. The one thing that they’re
uncomfortable with is sewing. And so once they started
getting into the sewing and they realized,
hey, this is cool. I’ve learned how to
sew along with coding, they really liked it. I tried the paper circuit– or the E-card. I tried the
wristband, the mural, and we got into the human sensor
project but we didn’t finish. And that’s the one thing that
I want to let everybody know. That you have to really
gauge your students and you can’t rush them. So this is a unit that you want
to give yourself enough time to work on. I mean, obviously, you can maybe
take out one of the projects. But give your
students enough time. And give them the
space and the time that they need to be creative
otherwise they’ll feel rushed. That’s one tip that I wanted
to share with everybody. NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN: Now, as
you wrote that curriculum, Deborah, how did you
time out how long it will take to make a project? And then, Pam, how did that
play out in your class? We know that we have this
grandiose idea of things happening and then
assemblies happen, and fire drills, and all
that kind of stuff, right? DEBORAH FIELD: So we
started off with how long it takes to do the
projects if you’re focused. It’s a little easier when you
have long periods of focus. But some of us have 50 minute
classes five days a week, or four days a week or whatever. And so you just adapt. Yeah, it’s also going to
depend on you as a teacher. So what we’ve found– so we did this. We piloted this for
three years before we released the curriculum. So we’re fairly confident
that it can work. Although first, make all
the project yourself. If you don’t I wouldn’t keep it. Drop it. Go home. Because we found it’s like
if you don’t do it yourself you really don’t have
an inside understanding. Why would you try to teach
some code or some concept that you haven’t
learned for yourself? You’re still going to run
into a lot of unique issues. I’ve been doing
this for nine years and I still run into new
problems that I’m like, I don’t know how you
created that problem but that’s unique so thanks
for introducing that to me. The other thing we found
is that for your first time if you want to do the full
unit, for the first time leave 12 weeks. That’s a long time. I really think it
can be done in 10 if you’re not taking field
trips, testing, and all that, right? 10 actually, and
it can probably be done a little bit shorter if
you can really get your kids focused. And that means– so these are
projects and a lot of students are not used to
monitoring their time. And you’ll see this if
you do the paper circuit, and you let them draw their
ideas first and then follow through you, will see there’s
loads of personal expression in some of those paper cards. They’re drawing, they’re
coloring, they might go home, bring in stickers. It’s fabulous to
see that engagement. But the students are like, oh
my gosh, it’s all of a sudden, I have room for personal
expression in school? And they’ll take as much of
that space as you allow them. And so there’s a
bit of a tension. How much time do you
allow for decorating? How much time do you
focus things in class? One thing I find
really helped is do allow for some
personalization and decorating in class. But that’s also quite
often not something that they can do at home that
they already have skills to do. So I try to focus at
class time on the things that they can’t really
do without your help, so designing the circuitry,
practicing the coding, debugging the coding. A lot of students if they’re
given the opportunity, will come in for lunch and for
after school if you let them. Some teachers have
said they’ve had students come in for the
first time outside of class. So you also have to
make those opportunities and that’s your time. And then like I said, the first
year we recommend 12 weeks. Almost all the teachers who
allowed that last year were able to finish the unit. But and then the second year
it comes more compressed. Because you, as a
teacher, have to learn to teach them a slightly
different style, right? It’s more project-focused,
it’s personalized. You are teaching
the same content you have to build
a culture where you can let peers teach each other. So a lot of getting up,
walking around the room, sharing ideas, but that
takes time to create. So you may have some of
that from your ECS culture that you’ve built already. That helps a lot. And then a lot of our teachers
will develop small minor goals. Like today your goal is
to sew that negative line in your circuit. Today you need to
connect your two lights. Today turn your lights on. So like I said, that
gets back to the students not having a lot of
experience with managing a bigger project, which is why
we scaffold the project up. And then some are just going
to want to go above and beyond, and some of them can do
that on their own time or after school so. NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN: Thank you [INTERPOSING VOICES] PAMELA: On the 12
weeks, I started mine in mid-March last year and
didn’t finish the human sensor. But yeah, anywhere from
I think 10 to 12 weeks is what you would need to
get all of the projects done. NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN:
And then did you have any tips or tricks
on managing the classroom, and students helping each
other as Deborah mentioned? Or how did you
engage participation so you had some students
who weren’t just kind of waiting for [INAUDIBLE]
to do the projects for them, or spending all day
on the creation piece? PAMELA: There’s always
those students that really like to work by themselves,
and those are the ones that I encourage to
work with somebody. Because they usually have the
most problems because they don’t really want to share. So this is a good experience for
those students who don’t really like to work with
other students. Because if they get stuff
they can ask somebody else. So I did a lot of pair
work more than group work. Because sometimes when
you do group work– when I did group work last year
the students got distracted. So working in pairs kept them
a little bit more engaged. The hardest thing to me
last year was the sewing. And I wanted to talk
about the sewing. I don’t know if
there’s other questions that you were going to ask. But I just want to
address the sewing. Because last year I don’t
think I’ve spent enough time pre the sewing part of it. Actually, today I started the
sewing part in my second year, and I spent a whole
period in sewing. I had them all thread a
needle and then create a knot. And I made sure that each
and every one of the students was able to thread a
needle and create a knot. Because those
sometimes seem to be the hardest part for the
kids to create the knot. And so I watched
them, we saw a video, and then I had them do it. And I made sure
everybody did it. So I want to spend more time
on this sewing this time. Because last time a lot of
kids had issues with sewing. NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN:
Yeah, I could imagine [INTERPOSING VOICES] DEBORAH FIELD: I’m
going to share one thing and it’s going to cause me
to jump a bunch of slides. And it’s one of my
favorite teaching practices that we’ve seen, so I’ve just
got to get over to slide 19. OK, so there’s a really
amazing opportunity. One of the things that
when we talk with teachers they like the best
is how many mistakes happen in each E-textiles, which
is sort of counterintuitive. But the mistakes or the
bugs allow for a few things. One, it allows you
to focus students on the process of
making something and not just having something that
was perfect the first time. Every educator ever
wants students to learn to revise and debug, iterate. And this is a perfect
opportunity for that. And we see a lot of redesigning,
a lot of students not taking your advice sewing something
maybe not the best way, and then they realize
the consequences of that. And they’re often invested
enough to go back and change it. One other thing that–
a teaching practice that can really support this
is modeling your own mistakes. So make your projects. first, all of them. And note the times that you
screw up and share those. Those are wonderful
learning opportunities. And it also makes it OK for
students to make mistakes too. So it lowers the
stakes of failure– or maybe not failure,
but bugs and issues. I have a teacher who goes around
and when students do something that doesn’t work out and
he’s helping them fix it he calls everyone to class– the whole class essentially–
that hey, everybody, this is my favorite mistake of the
day and highlights what it is. And it’s a wonderful in the
moment just in time learning thing that celebrates the
mistake as a learning moment. Another thing you can
do just on the same line is share tips and tricks. Have the students
write down what tip would you give to someone else? Because that usually comes from
some mistake that they’ve made and they fixed. The more you can spread
everyone’s mistakes the more people learn. I’ve learned so much from
helping with other people’s mistakes that I haven’t made– mistakes, bugs, whatever. And then by having students
share tips and tricks, you locate the
expertise in a student. So you give them ownership of
the expertise that gives them ownership over some of
that classroom knowledge now, instead of it all being
located in the teacher. So anyway, I’ll
jump back slides, but that’s my favorite thing. NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN: I like
that productive failure. I’d love to hear from
folks who are online either in the islands chat or you
can come up top to the– raise your hand and join in. But I’d love to
hear how you deal with that positive failure. I once heard in a workshop
I was in, failed stands for first attempt in learning. So I was like, oh, that’s
your first attempt. Well, when you learn
to play a sport you have multiple
attempts at trying to learn how to dribble a ball. Or when you play an instrument
how often do you sound terrible before you ever sound good? So this is your first attempt. Well, OK, this is your
the next four attempts. But what are some
tips and tricks that you all use to
get students to keep going when they have
those little mini failures or those
bumps in the road? See what you guys can
share with us in the chats. PAMELA: Are you
waiting for a chat? Because I have to tip and trick. NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN: Yeah, sure. Share a tip with us, Pam. PAMELA: 100% what Debbie says,
celebrate their mistakes. Because I always
tell my kids you can’t learn without
making a mistake. There’s nobody that
hasn’t invented something without making mistakes
so mistakes are good. They’re learning tools. But just celebrating
anything, like Debbie says, benchmarks– when they’ve
sewn one LED light on. That’s a really good
thing for them to see. And one of the things that I
noticed that a lot of my kids were doing trying to
take shortcuts– well, not a lot but some of them. They’re sewing the big stitches. So you want to tell
them ahead of time to not make the stitches so
wide because then it gets loose and things like that. So watch for your kids
that their sewing is– what is it, no more than an
inch or half an inch, Debbie? I can’t remember exactly– between each stitch. DEBORAH FIELD: Quarter inch. PAMELA: Yeah, quarter inch. Yeah. And they were huge and then
it would get really loose and then the lights
wouldn’t turn on. So that’s one tip
I wanted to share. DEBORAH FIELD: Yeah,
and often we see them– [INTERPOSING VOICES] NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN:
More a quarter inch. PAMELA: Yeah, quarter inch. DEBORAH FIELD: Or you can
you can model it for them. And what I’ll do is if their
stitches are really long, I just go and yank them out. Because there’s an
actual reason for it. Don’t do quarter-inch stitches
just because we told you to. There’s like a functional
reason behind it. And often in the
wristband, you see a lot of really crummy sewing. Pretty good for kids
that are brand new. And that’s a motor skill. It takes time to learn
that motor skill, so let them be crummy. But that’s a practice,
and then the next one they usually improve. And if they have to debug
because their stitches are all over the place, and
their threads are crossing, and their lights
aren’t turning on, and their battery is getting
hot– which by the way, take the battery out. Yeah, it’s fun. NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN: Wow. I hear that Joanna
uses plastic shoe boxes to have student projects in. And Deborah mentioned
the gallon sized Ziploc. I think that managing
piece is huge. So if we want Pam to
share a little bit with us about managing supplies
on the slide here. One of our big ideas. I would love to hear how
you manage all these things. PAMELA: OK, yeah, you
really should get organized before you start the unit. I was lucky enough to get my
supplies from Debbie’s grant, so I haven’t really had or
know a low amount of supplies. However, I did find
out that last year if you don’t have
the students be careful they will lose things. A lot of needles got lost. A lot of scissors got lost. So what I like to do is
I like to keep everything in one place. And everybody can do it
the way they want to, but I learned from last year. And giving everybody
one of everything I lost a lot of supplies. So I pretty much keep
everything in boxes. I have all my
scissors in one box, all of the needles, the sewing. And I categorize them. But they each get a Ziploc bag
to put their actual projects in. And if I give them a
needle and a thread and I also tell them
to be careful because I found a lot of needles lost. And that dangerous stuff
needles just lying around. So I would be careful
with making sure that you don’t give
everybody one of everything because then it walks
away, only what they really need on a daily basis. Because they have– part of
the supplies are the colored pencils, the pencils,
the erasers, the– I’m trying to think of
the fabric, the fabric markers, the glue. There’s a lot of different
supplies that you can get and they easily
get lost or wasted. So my idea is just to
manage everything myself and give them only what
they have absolutely need. NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN:
That is great. DEBORAH FIELD: We’ve also
seen a lot of other teachers– so Pam’s class right
now is a computer lab. And so it’s really hard
to have shared supplies amongst small groups of kids. But we’ve had a lot of success
in some other classrooms where you can have
tables, where you don’t have those computers
in the way, where you can have a shared table supply. And maybe that’s where you have
some thread, needles, scissors, and stuff. That way everyone can share
those and put those away at the end of the day. And then have a separate storage
for their individual project which can go right
in that bench. So all of this,
whatever you do, you have to build the
classroom practices. Students won’t know how you
want them to manage materials until you show them so. [BACKGROUND NOISE] Whew, exciting, movement. So, sorry for the noise. So one common easy thing to do
is have one person from a table go get the shared supplies and
all their individual projects out and just start our class
when they come in before class. And then have that same
person put it away. Or Pam has this great organizing
system where it’s alphabetized with student’s individual
bags of their project and they just pull it out
and then they put it back. And it happens before
and after class now. At the beginning getting
all those supplies out and the putting them back
takes a little bit of time. And you have to train
students like, OK, what you do with your needle? You either stuff
it in your project or you put it back in
your needle holder, which could be as simple
as a piece of paper or a piece of felt– scrap
felt, or like whatever– a needle pin cushion. NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN:
That’s a great idea. I’ve seen some teachers get a
jewelry case that hangs up– like a shoe thing– and have little cubbies for
the things to be in there. But then if you have multiple
classes who are sharing you’re going to have to make
sure that they put them back so the person in the next
class can pull it out. Any ideas from Joanna or those
who have already tried some of the E-textiles of how
you manage the supply? DEBORAH FIELD: While
Joanna’s typing, if you guys have any other
questions that you want answered, please raise them. NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN: It looks
like Joanna has the peg board to organize all the
E-textile supplies, so that’s a great idea. And I think as we start
having more maker stations. I’d love to see like a whole
Pinterest board, different ways that people set up just
the physical aspect of how to put things up there and
then having kids come in and get things. I think that’s a great way
to reemphasize algorithms. Like what are their
algorithms to go ahead and get the supplies, what are their
algorithm but put them away. But trying to talk
about those procedures that we always have
to have happen. It looks like Joanna’s
in a computer lab. I think a lot of teachers
will be in computer labs. So maybe finding a way
to bring the keyboard and putting it on the side,
or making space for two people to work together. Because I think that that’s
key to have a partner keep you on track, definitely. Pam, I’d love to hear
what you do with getting started with E-textiles. How did you bring that unit in? How did you get the
kids excited about it? And then how did you
scaffold those projects? PAMELA: The kids– we
had just finished– I skipped around in
the ECS curriculum, so I just finished
the Scratch unit. And the kids were actually
pretty bored with Scratch, and so I kept telling them
finish your final project for Scratch because
we’re going to do something really exciting. You’re going to get to play
with mice and circuitry. And so I kept
telling him every day about this exciting new thing
we were going to be doing, and they’re going to
be something different and it’s very hands on. And when I [INAUDIBLE],, I
followed Debbie’s curriculum pretty much to a T. So I
started with the E-card and the batteries. But they were
really excited when I started showing them
what a battery was, and how the little lights
that you start lighting up. And I don’t know,
something about the boys, they really get
excited with lights. I don’t know, they just love it. And so that’s pretty
much how I did it. And then now I’m going to start
on the wrist band project. And I thought I was a
little bit concerned with the boys
because of the sewing because they’re the ones that
complain about the sewing. But they were the ones
that were actually the more excited than the
girls to learn how to sew. They were like, oh this is cool. When I get out of here I’m
going to know how to sew. So all of these different
things that they’re doing, especially hands-on
kinesthetic stuff, it really engages them. So I can hardly wait to see
what they what they produce. NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN: Awesome. Now as you talk
about that E-card, can you tell us a
little bit more. What do they do
with the E-cards? Talk about batteries a
little bit and lights. Do they glue them on? Do they sew them on? Or what they do
with the E-cards? PAMELA: No, no, the
E-card it’s just them learning basic circuitry. It’s really basic. They use the tape. I love Debbie’s idea
because the card has a light bulb on the
front and the prompt is think about something
that you’d want to light up. And I remember when I
did it in the PD I really found that interesting
because like you think about all the things,
what do you want to light up? What do you want to– and as an educator, I was
thinking about knowledge, OK? But the kids actually
think about other things. So that’s really what they do. They draw first something
that they want to light up. They don’t actually
do the circuit until after they
make their drawing. The only problem I had
this year was the kids didn’t do a lot of decorating. They were more interested
in the circuitry part of it. But last year I got a lot of
really cool E-cards, this year not as decorative as I did. But and then after they do
that then they learn how to do a really basic circuit. Right, Debbie? I mean– I don’t know if
there’s– did I leave anything out? But I think that there’s– go ahead. I’m sorry, go ahead. NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN:
I think it’s great, as you mentioned, to have them
think about something they’d like to light up. I think having students
stop and pause and journal is one of those things that
they do all throughout the ECS curriculum. But so often we don’t give
students the opportunity to do that self-expression
that Deborah mentioned, and actually be thoughtful of,
wow, what’s important to me? What do I want to light up? And hopefully, there’s that
classroom culture created where students feel like
they can share and put things that are
meaningful to them, whether it’s something personal
or something that they they’ve thought about with
their community. But, wow, having that
question of what would you want to light up? Is it someone who– [INTERPOSING VOICES] Or what kind of
things like that. PAMELA: One thing
I forgot to note was in this unit there’s
a lot of journaling. Debbie has something that
we call the design notebook. And it’s the relationship is
like artists, like DaVinci. And that’s part of
something that I mention and we start talking
about in the beginning also, what the purpose
of a design notebook is. And in that notebook, they
draw their circuit diagram. They do their sketches of
things that they want to create. So that’s another thing
that’s really good. They get to do a
lot of journaling. And I always tell them
when they do this there’s no right or wrong answers. Students are programmed
to think it’s either a right answer or
a wrong answer. But I keep tell them there
is no right or wrong answer. This is just what
you believe is true. I think another thing that’s
really inspiring for students are the teachers projects. So if you make yours and
put it up in the classroom so they can see,
a lot of student’s model what they make based
on what the teacher does. So if you made a stuffed animal
for your human sensor project, a lot of students
tend to do that. So it helps if you
can make one or two. And then once
you’ve done it once keep some projects from prior
years if the students let you. Another thing is
to try to make what the students are doing as
transparent as possible to each other. So we might call this
distributed cognition. We’re open to do
something like that. It’s showing them
each other’s projects and having a gallery walk,
holding up someone’s project. If they’re working
at tables it’s a little easier because
they can look over and see. If you’re in a situation
where the space constrains how much you can overlook
someone else, which is often something we can choose
not to do in a classroom because we don’t want them to
look over each other’s work. But in this unit,
it’s completely legit and actually really
helps you a lot if you can get students to
look at each other stuff so they get ideas. Oh, someone else did that. That’s really cool. Someone else did that, you know? That can really help. You can also show– in our– we have
a technical guide to accompany the curriculum,
and we show a lot of sample pictures of projects. So some teachers
have taken those and made a little
PowerPoint presentation where they show some ideas. And again, the
more you can spread ideas the more free students
feel for self expression. NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN: Awesome. I like that idea of
doing gallery walks. I feel like students when
they know they have to share, they put more thought
into their projects. And the same with journaling,
when they know that they’re going to be sharing their
journal, or their sketch, or their idea with someone
else and getting feedback, that they take more time. I love to have my
students write down their plan or
ideas for a project and then give other
students sticky notes. And they have to put
a glow and a grow on the sticky note
for that project plan. Because students have it
formulated in their mind what they want to do. So actually getting it
on paper and breaking it down into something
doable is really hard. It’s a hard task. And so I love to give the
stickies where I’m like, hey, write your sticky, put
a thought on your sticky. Put it on that
person’s notebook. And then if there are things
that, of course, aren’t that great, I can always pull
those stickies off because it’s not permanent in the notebook. So that people don’t feel like,
oh, everyone attacked my idea. I’m going to try to leave
some of those positive ones or break down, well,
what is it that they asked you more questions about
that you need to work on? So I think that’s awesome. I know that Joanna
put that she’s using journaling as
blog posts to capture ideas of their projects. I think that blog
post are awesome. Do people use journaling
online, digital? Or do most of you,
if you do journal, do it on paper and pencil? I know that people
have different opinions on the paper and pencil
versus digital journaling. PAMELA: In my classroom,
I do a combination because I like to be
able to read them right after they write them and if
they’re in their notebooks It’s hard after a class
to go and sit there. But then I could come
home and just read their journal entries. So I do a combination of both. The other thing
I wanted to say– I was going to say
it when someone was talking about pictures. Another thing we
do in E-textiles– which I love– Debbie has us do, is take
pictures of certain points of their projects. So when they get to a certain
point they’ll take a picture. And then they get to another
point to take a picture. And then they’ll take
a picture at the end. Because there is a portfolio
at the end of the– and someone just put up their
portfolio slide– that they do. And they show where
their project was at one point, and maybe
an error that they made, and then they show
the finished project. And they talk about maybe
the different iterations, and some of the successes,
and some of the challenges that they had in
creating the project. NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN: Awesome. I love these portfolio pieces in
here with revision, reflection, topics to guide their thinking. Can you talk a bit more
about some of these Deborah, for how you have the
teachers design [INAUDIBLE]?? DEBORAH FIELD: Well,
it’s in the curriculum. So in the final– so in our
first year the curriculum we didn’t have the portfolios. We added that in in the
second and third year and it’s in the final version. So one, this meets a ton of
CS standards if you need them, also write in. It really helps to
give the students more conscience about what
they’ve learned in their design process. It also helps value that
process and those mistakes. So we try to [INAUDIBLE]. We have them do a portfolio. And we try to get them to
take a picture of where their project is at every day,
their project, their code, whatever it is they worked on. If they make a mistake,
be like, ooh, ooh, take a picture, right? Take a picture of
all that messy stuff. And then take a picture after
you fix it or change it. So we have the portfolio
include one, a basic description of the project. So a really good example is
this little minion picture on the upper left here. They say how it works. This is exactly what they
have to do for their APCS principal thing, by the way. So we modeled it as an
early version of that. Next, we require two things,
two either changes or fixes that you made. So what’s a problem that came
up and how did you deal with it? So that forces them
to name a problem and then often to
narrow the problem down and to verbalize this. They can also point
to it in the pictures. So we try to get them to
annotate their pictures rather than just leaving them
blank with no titles. So this is also a good
communication thing. Or maybe no mistake
happened but they preempted a mistake
by making a change, or maybe they just made a change
because they felt like it. It’s almost impossible not to
do the human censor project without making some
change in your design or debugging something. And then at the end, we ask
them to reflect on what they learned in the unit overall. So a lot of them
are really concrete, like, I learned how to go look
at my evidence of learning how to sew better, or I learned
how to code text-based code. Some of them say I
became a problem solver, or I learned how to plan,
or I helped other people. So it’s pretty open. You can make it like a
physical journal if you want. Or you can have it be a
PowerPoint, or a Google thing, or a website. We’ve seen a lot of
different versions. We try not to make it too
complex because we really wanted to focus on the project,
and not get so caught up with the recording
and reflection that you miss out
on project time. But this is really good
evidence of learning and equal. NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN: Let’s stay
on this slide for a minute. As you’re thinking about
some of our audience here, how would you tailor
some of these projects to younger students in
elementary or middle school students? So what tips would you
give some of the teachers? DEBORAH FIELD: Well, first
of all, you could just– if you’re working with
the younger population you could modify the
curriculum to almost all be paper and tape. So it depends on the sewing
skills in your community. And those are going to be harder
skills for younger students but it’s not impossible
for them to do it. But it might just take a
little longer to learn. We’ve seen some teachers
bring in parents to help, that’s fine. To make a nice
intergenerational thing. You can also– what
was I thinking? So– OK, there’s that. You could also– some of
the computing concepts are going to be very challenging
for a younger audience. So you might keep it with
a simple mural project. Maybe just use one switch. Or maybe, with the
human sensor project we recommend having
four conditions, right? So you have no touching,
touching a little, touching more, and
really squeezing hard. But you could simplify that to
be touching or not touching. So you would simply write
the ranges different. So there are ways that for
a high school class that meant make you start kids on a
trajectory of computer science, you really want maybe
the higher rigor and really getting
all four conditions so they’re learning to write
multiple “if” statements. And mathematics being stressed,
like if it’s greater than 500 but less than 700, you
know that’s their range. But you could simplify
that for younger audiences if you just want to
get a certain concept. It’s like an if/else statement. NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN: Yeah,
I like some of those ideas. I think a lot of times
if you break down the activity, like
the four conditions, into maybe just two. Even talking to students
in elementary courses, hey, what kind of toys do you
have a home that you touch and their sensors? Or let’s make a list
of some of the things that we have in our
classroom that have sensors? How does it take that input? How does it show you? Does it vibrate? Does it make a sound? How long is the sound? All those different ways to just
make awareness of the students, that then they can think
about, well, what is it that I want my project to do? And maybe it is just one
light that they sew on. But how exciting is that
for a student to feel like, hey, I made this thing happen. And then maybe in another year,
they do a different project. And so really if you think
about each year having kids do something
that’s trial-based they could build
awesome projects. Which means those of
us at the high schools really have to up
our game if they’re getting a lot of exposure
when they’re younger. Because so many
of us this is new, I’m excited to find out
from elementary teachers who are on tonight,
what kind of ideas do you have now that
you’ve seen some of the projects and
the writing pieces? How might you
engage in this kind of a unit with your students
or what might you try? You can share in
the chat window, or if you want to join by audio. I’d love to hear
some ideas of what you think you could do in your
class and what grade you teach. DEBORAH FIELD: I’m also
going to list the name of one of my colleagues at Utah State. And I work for Utah
State University but I live in Los Angeles. So sorry for those of
you who live in Utah, and yay for those of you
who live in Los Angeles. But my colleague
Colby Tofel-Grehl is working on E-textiles
for science classes. So she emphasizes more
of the science end in using the E-textiles as
instruments to measure things, and a little less of the coding. So the kids don’t get quite
as in-depth into the coding and the computational
thinking side, but more into using the science. And she’s developed
some material. She’s an elementary
science teacher, was her career before she
became a faculty member. You can always be
in touch with her. She does a ton of
work in Utah, Oslo, and in the Intermountain
West, if you happen to be in those areas. NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN: Awesome. So I will have to Google
Colby and see what I can find. Because I think that
that’s a huge connection that we could make between
elementary, middle school, and high school. What are those projects
in your local community that the middle school’s doing
or the elementary school? And then how can you even
do, like for Computer Science Education Week, how
could you connect with those other schools to find
out how they’re doing things? And even supporting them. Maybe some of your
high school students can help the younger
students do the sewing. Or maybe they can
help them with some of their design
in their project. So that would be awesome. Elementary teachers I’d
love to hear from you. It looks like we’ve got Anne
talking, or typing right now. Let’s see what some
suggestions she has. And while she’s typing,
tips and tricks, Pam, that you might have
for us as we’re thinking about a teacher
new to e E-textiles. Would they maybe want to
start with one project? Would they maybe want to
start with the E-card? Or what kind of
suggestions would you set for them as
they’re tinkering with the idea of
getting started? Oh, you’re muted. PAMELA: Again, sorry. I would definitely do
everything in the unit as Deborah said, yourself. So before you even start,
do the E-card on your own. Read up. Do as much research as
you can if you’re not sure about circuits. I mean, the lessons are
very, very step-by-step. It’s really not that
hard to understand. But when you start getting
into the more difficult– if you’re not really
good at coding make sure you do all the coding
yourself, all the sewing. Everything, do it yourself
ahead of time so that you know. Do not walk in there and try to
start a lesson without having done it yourself. And doing a lot of the
reading ahead of time so that you understand what
it is you’re trying to teach. Because you don’t want to get
stuck in the middle of a lesson and not know exactly what
needs to get done, or not be able to maybe guide students. Because as Deborah said,
there’s a lot of good mistakes that happen and you want to
highlight those mistakes. But if you’re not sure
what those mistakes are and how to help students
work through them, then it might make
you feel uncomfortable and you might not be successful. NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN: What
coding language does the do unit projects use? PAMELA: I’m sorry,
I didn’t hear that? NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN: What
coding language does the project in the projects use? PAMELA: It Arduino. NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN:
It’s Java-based, right? PAMELA: Yeah, and
so it’s really easy. DEBORAH FIELD: It’s Arduino. You could if you wanted to– oh, sorry. The materials we recommend are
the Circuit Playground classic, But if you’re willing
to pay $5 more you can use the
Circuit Playground Express which is designed
to work with Make A Code. So if you really want to be in
a visual programming environment you could be. You’d have to make that
translation yourself because we’ve
designed the materials to be used with Arduino
but it is possible. Most of these we didn’t do
that because we’d already made the whole unit, and it
meant to be used with Arduino. Also, we find the
students really like to use text-based code,
even though, gosh, they make so many mistakes with
capital letters and syntax and stuff, they feel
more professional. And there’s been a lot
of research on that. Even though you can really
get deeper more quickly in some ways with
block-based code, they feel it’s more
authentic in text-based. NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN: Awesome. Well, thank you. We’ve got just a couple minutes. So I want to make sure that
if you have any questions you put them in the
chat window, or you can ask them while we’ve got our
expert panelists on the line. I always think it’s great
to hear from a teacher who’s tried it out in the classroom,
and also Deborah who’s had the opportunity
to work with teachers and create the curriculum. It looks like Deborah’s
shared her email address here. We’ve also got a
short survey for you to fill out if you would,
once we finish up the webinar. So we’ve got the Survey
Monkey for you to fill out. We’ve got a couple other
events coming up soon. So on February 25th
through March 1st we’ve got what’s called
a slow Twitter chat, where we have one post a day on
getting makers in the classroom and how to be inclusive. And then in March,
we’ve got a webinar coming up on using
cooperative learning strategies to engage students. And I think that this
time of year right now, we’ve got about a
month in March where you don’t have a lot going on. Students are kind of
getting tired of school. They want Spring
break to happen, and so this webinar on
cooperative learning strategy is a fun webinar where we’ll
have different teachers share things they do to
get kids talking, get kids in groups,
[INAUDIBLE] going on. So that will be awesome. As for those of you who
have not been on the CS For All Teachers
community site, we have a lot of different
groups that you can go visit. In our CS and elementary
groups, we have some resources on Black History Month and
Valentine’s activities. We have some encryption
activities in the middle school group. In the ECS open group, there are
some professional development opportunities. In the CSP open
group, if you are working on your
explore task, there’s a great resource called
The Survival Guide, which helps the
students if they’re writing for that big project. On CS In The Wild, we have CS
in movies, The Good, The Bad, The Ugly. And sometimes it’s fun to
bring in where we see computer science happening in movies. And then in the
community blog, we have a post about CS
Absolutely Matters In Communities Of Color, by
one of our ambassadors, Donald. The link again to
the resources Is http://www,exploring.org/e
textiles. So you can go there,
check out all the things that Deborah’s been sharing,
as well as email her if you’ve got any questions. And then if you have not become
a member yet of the community, membership is free today
and every other day. But it’s a great way to
connect with teachers. As Pam was talking
to us earlier, she’s the only teacher that
teaches Exploring Computer Science in our school. And I feel like
a lot of teachers are solo in their school
doing computer science and trying to find
ways to integrate it. So finding a community where you
can talk with other teachers, ask questions, come
to webinars where you can hear great ideas
and network with people, is amazing. And to have it free,
that’s even better. And so you can come
to the link for http://www.csforallteachers.org. And then sign up to be a member. We’d love to have you. And then if you
have any questions, you can always email the site. We’ve got Melissa
who’s been hosting us from AIR, who’s been so
gracious to help us out tonight. And then I want to
thank Deborah and Pam for preparing, and planning, and
spending the last hour with us sharing all of
their great ideas. PAMELA: Thank you, Nicole. Can I just say one thing? If any of the teachers
out there want to eat reach out
to me personally, I’m in the ECS open group. I’d be happy to
answer any questions, send you pictures,
whatever you need. Just reach out to me
on the ECS open group. NICOLE REITZ-LARSEN:
Thank you, Pam. MELISSA: Thank you
so much, everyone. This is Melissa, again. This has been an
absolute pleasure. I’ve certainly enjoyed
the conversation. And I’ve learned just
as much in the chat box as I did from the presentation. So I am so happy to have so
many active participants. As I’ve mentioned
in the chat box, we will be adding
tonight’s presentation, as well as the recording link on
our website on the event page. Which I’m going to
post in there again, so you can bookmark that. Give us a day or two and
we’ll have that updated so that you are able to take
a look if you want to go back to the recording, or if you want
to share it with someone who’s been part of this. And so with that, I’m going
to go ahead and tell you all thanks again, and I hope
you have a fabulous night.

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