White Coat Ceremony 2019

White Coat Ceremony 2019


– I’m Bob Alpern. I’m the Dean of the
Yale School of Medicine and I’d like to welcome you
to one of the happiest days at Yale, the White Coat Ceremony. The other happy day is graduation where we’ll all be back here. So family members, alumni, faculty, staff and most importantly, our newest students, the class of 2023, welcome
to the White Coat Ceremony. (audience applauding) Parents and relatives,
I imagine you have to be incredibly proud and so you should be. Today represents the culmination
of decades of commitment on your part and the part
of our newest students. Students, today is a momentous day in your evolution to become a physician. Doctor Emily Wong will
speak to you shortly on an important theme, if
there is just one thing. Before her talk, I’d like
to take just a few moments to comment on the Yale School of Medicine, what it means to you
and what it means to us and what you mean to us. Together, you represent just over 2% of those who applied for a
seat in the class of 2023. 104 individuals with
extraordinary academic and extra academic accomplishments, 51 men, 53 women, 85 MD
students and 19 MD PHD students. 10 of you have already
earned an advanced degree. You graduated from 54
undergraduate colleges and 32 of you were born
outside the United States, representing countries of Bangladesh, Canada, China, Columbia, Indonesia, India, Jordan, Korea, Nigeria, Nepal, Portugal, Singapore,
Turkey, Vietnam and Zimbabwe. The emotions of, (audience applauding) The emotions of today are best captured by the comments that were made
by the dean of Yale College, my first year here when
my daughter was admitted to Yale College and I
always remembered this because I thought it was brilliant and what he said was, “I can sense today, “feelings of pride, perhaps
tinged with anxiety, “of excitement, moderated by vulnerability “and of the thrill of new places, “tempered by nostalgia for
what one has left behind “and these are just the
feelings of your parents.” (audience laughing) Yale School of Medicine is
a unique medical school. It combines outstanding faculty
with remarkable students and a tradition of excellence that dates back over 200 years. In 2010, we celebrated
the school’s bicentennial. In 2012, Brian Kobilca, a
Yale School of Medicine alum, was awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry. In 2013, Jim Rothman, chair of the Department of Cell Biology, was awarded the Nobel Prize
in physiology or medicine. In 2015, Vivek Murphy,
an alumnus of our school, was sworn in as the Surgeon
General of the United States. In 2016, five of our young investigators were named Howard Hughes Medical
Institute Faculty Scholars to recognize the best biomedical
researchers in the country. Yale tied with only one other school for the highest number of awardees and there are many other stories. Yale University awarded
the first medical degree in the United States in 1723. Now we were not the first medical school because in those days,
regulations were not as strictly enforced as they are today. And Yale was able to
award a medical degree 87 years before it had a medical school. (audience laughing) The other interesting thing is that the awardee was never in New Haven. (audience laughing) I won’t say how he got the degree. Since Yale School of Medicine
was officially established in 1810, the names of those
who have walked these halls are astonishing and now
you will walk these halls. Many of you are probably
wondering how did I get into Yale? Do I belong in the same place that has educated so many of
the greatest minds in medicine, those who define the
discipline of medicine as we know it today. The answer, believe it or
not, is a resounding yes. I want to assure you that
your admission to Yale was not a careless error, but an acknowledgement of all
that you have accomplished and all that we know you will
accomplish in the future. The Yale system is unique
among medical schools. You will not receive grades
during the pre-clinical years nor will you be ranked. Why is that? Were we trying to make it easier for you? No. The answer is, we expect
greater things from you than grades could ever engender. We expect you to become a leader in the medical world of tomorrow. You’re probably thinking, “Not me.” But you will be surprised. Your intelligence, your
commitment to excellence and your Yale education will place you among the leaders in medicine no matter how you choose to pursue this. It is our hope that you
will seize this opportunity to develop into an outstanding physician, a critical thinker who learns
what he or she needs to know, but is not content with that. You will establish new
understandings of disease processes, new approaches to patient care and new paradigms for
the practice of medicine. Some of you will do this
as practicing physicians, some as academicians focused on research, clinical medicine or education, some through health policy and others through
involvement in industry. We have enormous confidence in you. You’re surrounded by
outstanding classmates, but you should not see
them as competition, rather as part of a team
that working together will insure that the
world is a better place because Yale School of
Medicine had a class of 2023. If we do our jobs and you do yours, years from now, students
will walk the halls of the Medical School
wondering if they belong in the same institution that
trained the class of 2023. Thank you. (audience applauding) One of the traditions at
the White Coat Ceremony is that we have a faculty member present the White Coats talk and
today’s speaker is Emily Wong. Emily got her undergraduate
degree at Harvard University and we forgive her for that. (audience laughing) She got her MD degree at Duke and then a masters at the University of
California in San Francisco. She did her internship,
residency and a general medicine fellowship at UCSF and then in 2008, she joined the faculty of Yale and today she’s an associate
professor on our faculty. In 2016, she became one of six faculty academic advisors to the students. She also has co-founded a
transition clinic network which provides healthcare to ex-prisoners and I’m sure she’ll be talking about that. She has many accomplishments
in her career, but I thought I would
summarize just a few of them. In 2002, she won the Caring
for the Community Award from the Association of
American Medical Colleges. In 2012, she was a nominee for the Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine
Award at Yale University. In 2012, she was a member of the Institute of Medicine Workshop
on Health and Incarceration. In 2016, she was a member
of the Steering Committee of the Institute of Medicine Workshop on Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs and in 2019, she was a member of the Technical Expert Group of
the World Health Organization on Health in Prisons Program. Emily will speak to us today,
if there is just one thing. (audience applauding) – A deep thank you to the deans for inviting me to speak today. Well it is a real honor
to be here this afternoon. A big welcome to the class of 2023, to your family and friends. This important rite of passage is an opportunity for us
all to reflect with you as you start your journey in medicine on the meaning of our profession, which, at its core, is centered around improving the health of our patients and responsibilities to them, to our community and to each other. It’s been almost 20 years
since I participated in my White Coat Ceremony
and I’ll be honest, I don’t remember as much as I should about my formal medical education, but my White Coat Ceremony stands clear in my mind still today. I’m one of those people,
that since I was young, I knew I wanted to be a physician. My father passed away from colon cancer when my sister and I were young and his illness and his
interactions with his physicians set me singularly on the path
to medicine from a young age, a clinical career, one
focused on curing disease, one patient at a time. So I remember feeling a
serious amount of excitement, almost to the point of nausea, finally to get my stethoscope
and my white coat, to be entering the profession. I finally made it. On a day just like today, I listened to the White Coat speaker reflect on the values of our profession and the remarks ended
with one primary point that was valuable that I
wanted to share with you today. If there is one thing
you should know, he said, it’s that it’s critical to
walk in our patient’s shoes. The speaker implored us to
hold compassion and empathy as the hallmark in clinical care as important to scientific excellence. This resonated with me. I’d spent two years working
in a hospice in Boston and spent many hours with
women in their final months and could see that it was both medications and a physician’s connection
to her patients that mattered. It felt clear to me then
that to be the doctor I wanted to be, I had to develop expertise in pathophysiology, pharmacology, also get good at interviewing and building trust with my patients. But in looking back, my
thinking was limited, the skills that I thought
I needed were too narrow and what’s being asked of you, as a new generation of physicians, requires these skills and much more. The news is filled with
stories of injustices in the healthcare system,
restrictions on women’s rights and abortion, exorbitant
costs of medications, so what does it mean to walk
in our patient’s shoes today? I want to reflect on my
own path through medicine and share with you a handful of tips I wish I had known at the
beginning of my career. First, foremost, get out
of your comfort zone. For me, preparing for medical school meant I’d spent time in
a lab and in a hospital so getting out that comfort zone meant getting off of campus,
outside of the classroom because it was there that I started to see the many forces that
impacted my patient’s health and even changed my path in medicine. I came to medical school squarely fixated on being an HIV physician. This was during the HIV epidemic where hospital wards were filled with patients dying of AIDS. To become an HIV physician, I focused on basic science research and worked in a top notch lab at Duke, studying the immunology of acute HIV, but it was outside the lab, while having a conversation
with a friend of mine who worked in the prisons, that I learned that the U.S. has the largest prison
system in the world. One in 100 U.S. adults are behind bars. There are large racial
disparities of who’s behind bars. Whites and blacks commit
crimes at equal rates, but blacks serve longer sentences and are disproportionally
represented on death row. People who are incarcerated
have higher rates of infectious diseases than the general population including HIV. As a budding HIV doctor,
this blew my mind. So I made a point to
visit the women’s prison in Raleigh, North Carolina to learn more and discovered, that in fact, the rates of HIV and
sexually transmitted diseases were four times higher
in these young women than the general population. I was asked to lead a
health education program focused on women’s health and
it was through these classes that I was giving, I started to see how the skills we’re learning
in medical school, even the tools we had to prevent unwanted health outcomes, wear a condom, get tested for HIV, lied
squarely on the individual and rarely addressed the
bigger issues at hand. Every single one of the women I met had been physically and repeatedly
assaulted in their lives. Their insurance didn’t cover
certain forms of birth control. They lost their jobs
because they didn’t have paid parental leave. The doctoring tools I had, felt weak. Imploring these women to
change their behaviors in the face of these realities seemed to miss the bigger picture. Stepping into a prison, of course, getting out of my comfort zone, set my career on a totally
different trajectory. From this day forward, you
too will have opportunities to get out of your comfort zone. This might mean you pushing yourself to learn a new language,
doing home visits, writing an op-ed, writing a poem, traveling to rural Appalachia or to the Indian Health Service to get a glimpse at the
realities of a part of the U.S. that you just don’t know. You now have this new perspective and power as medical
students which I’m confident is gonna shift your
understanding of health. My second piece of advice
is to read at least one book on medical history. One of my favorite books is
“And The Band Played On”, a book written in 1987, which
is an exhaustive history of the AIDS epidemic, chronically
the neglect of governments and the medical establishment
in the early years of the epidemic. The author’s premise is that
AIDS was allowed to happen. While the disease, as we
know, is caused by a virus, incompetence, apathy, homophobia, racism allowed its spread to become much worse and this included doctors and scientists, some of who are very much alive today. Reading this history, I felt that it’s the
story of us, of us all. We’re part of history in the making and we’re flawed and biased ourselves. In my career, I’ve been
schooled over and over again, often by patients that
our power as a profession has both been a force for
tremendous agency and progress, but also as a force for
oppression and cruelty. Perhaps nothing illustrates
this better for me than physicians who work in prison. During residency, I worked
in San Quentin Prison. Healthcare is interestingly Constitutionally guaranteed behind bars. It’s one of the only places in the U.S. where there is a Constitutional
guarantee for primary care. 13,000,000 individuals pass
through our correctional system each and every year and many
first access primary care when they’re incarcerated. So by necessity and by law,
doctors work behind bars. Some of the most amazing
physicians work there, ones who’ve started the first opioid treatment programs in
jail, who quit their jobs, refusing to participate
in the death penalty, organized against solitary confinement and the shackling of women
when they’re delivering babies. But I’ve also seen how the
very practice of medicine in a correctional setting is an exercise of structural violence, how our history impacts our patients. Let me give you an example. For the past year, my team has taken care of a
patient in Yale’s primary care, who had spent decades in
prison and was HIV positive, not on any medications, but
with stable low-grade disease. He was and has been insistent
on not taking any medications. In spite of new recommendations
that show benefit for all HIV patients to be
on anti-retroviral therapy. I never really quite
understood why until recently. He’s in the ICU now
with a severe infection, a gangrene in his leg and an HIV virus which is now uncontrolled. Still unwilling to start medications, we went to his bedside to talk and with tears in his eyes, he recounted his experience
over the past 30 years, the stigma of being diagnosed
in the 1990’s in prison when the disease was defined by physicians and scientists as a gay cancer and didn’t include patients like himself, a heterosexual black man. Being mentored by an older man who was also HIV positive,
who ended up dying in prison immediately after starting
the first generation of HIV medications that were quite toxic and being completely isolated
from the new advances in medical knowledge
on HIV while in prison. My patient’s story is the history of HIV. The stigma fueled by medical
professionals and scientists, the fear of the unknown, the human errors of medical
knowledge in its infancy and the mistrust of
physicians and medications and it’s in knowing that history that our team could finally acknowledge the past wrongs of our profession, validate his fears and
reengage him in treatment. These white coats that you’ll be wearing, they have a history,
one that you should know and remember that each and every time you enter a patient’s room, you
carry that history with you. My third piece of advice is
that the practice of medicine is inherently and increasingly political. Your generation of physicians
is the most challenge, I would content, by moral choice. The cost of drugs, including
insulin and epinephrine have skyrocketed so high
that patients are dying for lack of access. Hospitals today are worried
about cost containment and concentration of the market share. When I was where you are, I thought that healthcare
organizations were, at the core, ethical. They put their patients first. This is a naive view. It’s much more complicated than that, but your role as physicians
does not have to be. Who you choose to care for, weather your health system
accepts certain insurance, what you speak out about or don’t are all political decisions
and let’s be clear, you don’t have to be a
political activist to advocate. There are advocates all around you. Take Dr. Kashalipska, who,
as an endocrinologist, a physician scientist here at Yale, is leading a national discussion on the inequities of insulin pricing. Or Dr. Dirk Johnson, a trauma surgeon who is actively working on mitigating gun violence in New Haven. In my own career, I have found that keeping myself honest to
the urgent and political nature of our work, is done
by partnering with patients. It’s easier to be a bystander, to keep silent when you don’t
have to pay for insulin, aren’t living in communities
that are under the threat of gun violence or have
not been incarcerated. Remember that your silence is
also a political statement. My lab has worked to
build the largest network of primary care programs in the U.S. that care for individuals with
a history of incarceration when they’re released. This has meant pushing up
against health system policies that discriminate against people with criminal records and begin vocal about how the health system is broken for the millions of people
who have been incarcerated, both behind the walls and outside. Throughout my career, I have been told that this work is just too political, but how can we practice medicine, keep our professional responsibility to our patients at the floor without engaging in politics,
without speaking out especially when our patient’s
health are compromised by systems that discriminate, commodify and literally shackle our
patients into poor health? So remember this, starting today, your white
coat gives you the privilege to bear witness to your
patient’s suffering and their strengths, to share that burden and then to safeguard their
human and civil rights. Here, at Yale, you’ll
certainly obtain the knowledge and skills to provide patients counseling, prescribe a med, enter an order, close a wound, even deliver a baby, but use this time to get
out of your comfort zone. Use this time to learn
the history of medicine, the policies that are promoted
or harmed patient health and how we, as a profession,
can advocate for our patients. Use it to listen to and
learn from your patients in the New Haven Community,
who can teach you the history, the underbelly of
medicine and the solutions that are right under our noses. Use this time to become
excellent scientists. Know the literature of health
disparities and equity. We cannot be indiscriminant advocates. Use the science or build
it to become better ones because this is what your
patients need you to do. Of course, there are gonna be many times when obtaining or exercising these skills are gonna feel challenging, will make you and others feel
uncomfortable and exhausted, will push you against professional and institutional norms. When you feel enraged,
wary, isolated or burdened, I want you to remember this, look around. No really, look around. (audience laughing) Look around at this beautiful
community of future doctors. Let that embolden you when
you’re feeling powerless and organize us in
partnership with our patients. Just this past week, there was an op-ed written in the New
Yorker by Dr. Eric Topol, examining the recent
history of our profession, the moral challenges of us practicing, imploring us physicians to organize against the injustices
in the healthcare system. He suggests that our
apolitical stance as physicians under guards our current predicament, but that there is hope that a new class of physicians is rising up. Forget hope. Let’s not traffic in hope. Instead, let’s together,
fiercely and doggedly rise to the calling of a
new professional ethos, one that puts justice at the fore. You’re at Yale. Use this privileged place
to educate yourself. There’s no better advocate
than an astute clinician and when your patients confide in you and when you bear witness
to their suffering and see these uncomfortable truths, you’ll then have the
ability to collectively sound the alarm, confront
our own complicity, identify with courage, with partnerships, science and clinical care, how best to tackle our nation’s persistent inequities in health. Only then are we gonna actualize our fullest potential as a profession and this, I think, is the deepest way that we can walk in our patient’s shoes. Thank you very much. It’s a real joy to be here. (audience applauding) – Well that was a challenge. Now you have your work cut out for you for the next four years. Or five years. So now is the time that we come to that, I think you’re all waiting for, but I know your parents are
definitely waiting for it and this is the time at which
we present the white coats. So joining me on stage to help me give out the white coats, we have
Dr. Richard Belitsky. You wanna stand up? The Deputy Dean for
Education, Dr. Darin Latimore, Deputy Dean for Diversity and Inclusion, Dr. Emily Wong, who you just heard from, Associate Professor in the
Department of Medicine, Dr. Nancy Angoff, Associate
Dean for Student Affairs. Dr. Angoff graduated from Yale in 1990. Dr. Barbara Kazmierczak,
director of the MD/PhD program and Dr. Laura Ment,
Associate Dean for Admissions and Financial Aid and I’ll
introduce Ayaska in a second. (laughing) You can sit down. Building on a tradition that started with the Bicentennial
Celebrations in 2010, Lillian Oshva, MD, a
member of the class of 1996 and president of the Association
of Yale Alumni and Medicine and Amy Liebeskind MD,
98, Vice President of AYM, will join us on stage
to present stethoscopes to each new student. The awarding of these
stethoscopes is sponsored by our generous alumni
who want to welcome you to their favorite medical school. And now, I’ll introduce,
joining at the podium, will be our Director of
Admissions, Ayaska Fernando, who will call you to the stage to receive your white
coats and stethoscopes. Together with Dr. Ment,
Ayaska played a critical role in selecting you as the
latest class of students and I have no doubt that you will agree that he has excellent taste. Thank you, Ayaska. (audience applauding) – Thank you Dean Alpern and
good afternoon, everyone. Class of 2023, here is the plan for
receiving your white coats. Your names will be called
alphabetically by last name. When I announce your name, come up stage left for your white coat. There will be hand
shakes and a photograph. Be sure to look at the camera and smile when shaking Dean Alpern’s hand. This is where the camera will be and you will be handed your stethoscope donated by the Association
of Yale Alumni in Medicine before exiting stage right. Parents, friends and family, if you’re interested, the
best place to take photographs is stage right, which is over here. So, that will be the best angle, the best view and that’s where the official photographer will be as well. Okay, let’s begin. Brendan Atkinson from Marietta College entering the MD/PhD program. Jafar Al Souz from the
University of California, Irvine, entering the MD/PhD program. Chidumebi Alim from Howard University. Mariana Almeida from Dartmouth College. Robert Amick from the University
of California, Los Angeles. Emily Avery from Princeton University. Douglas Barber from Brown University. Jenna Bergmann from Barnard College entering the MD/PhD program. Gabriel Betancur-Velez
from Yale University. Joseph Brancale from Harvard University entering the MD/PhD program. Yueming Cao from Brown University. Shin Mei Chan from Stanford University. Erika Chang-Sing from the
University of Southern California. Fuyao Chen from Vanderbilt University entering the MD/PhD program. Gloria Chen from Harvard University. David Chung from Brown University. Samuel Craft from Middlebury College. Lake Crawford from the
University of Kansas. Ellelan Degife from Pomona College. Maya Deshmukh from the
University of Michigan entering the MD/PhD program. Pranammya Dey from Yale University. Meera Dhodapkar from the
University of Chicago. Madeline DiGiovanni from Brown University. Mariana DoCarmo from Yale University entering the MD/PhD program. Jeffery Duncan from Haverford College entering the MD/PhD program. Chelsea Fearce from Spellman College entering the MD/PhD program. Mursal Gardezi from Brown University. Aidan Gilson from Massachusetts
Institute of Technology. Kevin Givechian from the
University of Southern California entering the MD/PhD program. Joshua Glahn from the
University of Pennsylvania. Ilhan Gokhan from Duke University entering the MD/PhD program. Kerrie Greene from Massachusetts
Institute of Technology entering the MD/PhD program. Daniel Grubman from Dartmouth College. Scott Grubman from Dartmouth College. Brett Gu from Yale University. Clara Guo from Dartmouth College. Scott Halperin from Tufts University. John Havlik from the
University of Chicago. Micheal Heyang from Cornell University. Sajid Hossain from Villanova University. Joshua Huttler from the
University of Virginia. Erica Hwang from Washington
University in St. Louis. Chinye Ijeli from University of Chicago. Guneet Janda from the
Ohio State University. Ann Johnson from Georgia
Institute of Technology entering the MD/PhD program. Samipya Kafle from the
University of Nevada, Reno. Arianna Kahler-Quesada from
Oregon State University. Nabeel Kassam from
Northwestern University. Jehanzeb Kayani from the
University of Connecticut. Christopher Keys from Brown University. Adam King from Lawrence University. We’ll take a pause for
that helicopter to go by. (unintelligible audience chatter) Okay, Emre Kiziltug Duke University. Johnathan Kluger from the
University of Pennsylvania. Sreeja Kodali from Yale University. – Chigoziri Konkwo from
University of Pennsylvania. Sophia Lapides-Wilson
from Yale University. Dana Lee from Yale University. Christina Lepore from Wellesley College. Amanda Liberman from Colgate University. Samuel Liburd from the
University of the Virgin Islands entering the MD/PhD program. Hieronimus Loho from Yale University. Ragini Luthra from Yale University. Marah Jawad Fayez Maayah
from Yale University. Mitchelle Matesva from
University of Pennsylvania. Hunter McCurdy from the
University of Wyoming. Ryan McLean from the
University of Connecticut. Chandler McMillan from Duke University. Osman Moneer from Columbia University. Jay Moran from Trinity College. Alyssa Morrison from Stanford University. Muzzammil Muhammad from
Stanford University. Michael Murphy from
Johns Hopkins University. Aishwarya Nene om California
Institute of Technology. Autumn Nobles from University of Georgia. Jamieson O’Marr from Stanford University. Jolanta Pach from Yale University. Carmen Pajarillo from Boston University. Hanya Qureshi from Columbia University. Divya Ramakrishnan from
Stanford University. Kelsey Rankin from Harvard University. Benjamin Reeves from Yale University. Jack Robbins from Florida State University entering the MD/PhD program. Alysha Rose from Del Hauser University. Alexander Sasse from
Vanderbilt University. Claudia See from Yale University. Rema Shah from Duke University. Apurv Shekar from Johns
Hopkins University. Josiah Sherman from Xavier University. Amrita Singh from Columbia University. Lauren Smith from the
University of Oklahoma. Zihan Su from Williams College. Anush Swaminathan from Boston University entering the MD/PhD program. Abriana Tasillo from Boston University. Tho Tran from Yale University. Sidharth Tyagi from the
University of Colorado, Boulder entering the MD/PhD program. Tanvee Varma from Wellesley College. Juliana Viera from Williams College. Michael Vetick from Rutgers University entering the MD/PhD program. Vickie Wang from Stanford University. Leslie Wang from Yale University. Gabe Weininger from Stanford University. Julia Wolfe from New York University. Deanne Yugawa from the University of Utah entering the MD/PhD program. And Tiannan Zhou from Yale University. (audience applauding) – So, this is my 16th White Coat Ceremony and I have to say, every
time I shake these hands, I’m convinced the admissions committee has admitted at least 200
students to the class. It sounds like a wonderful class from a lot of really terrific schools. So now we will have our Nancy Angoff, Associate Dean for Student Affairs, will present the Human
Relations Code of Conduct. – So to give you some context, earlier today, we spoke
with the incoming class about the Yale system and the community that it creates and all of the
responsibilities that we have to one another in that community. This code of conduct is an explanation of some of the principles that we live by. So I invite you to follow
along as I read it. Yale School of Medicine is committed to the promotion of personal
and professional development of all individuals in its community and encourages dialogue that will foster the growth, well being and
dignity of all its members. In pursuit of these goals, the school is dedicated to
maintaining an environment that places the highest priority
on collegial relationships, mutual respect and sensitivity
among its students, faculty, staff and patients. An educational community functions best when there is civility and respect for the dignity and
worth of each individual. It must be insured that our school is free from discrimination
and acts of intolerance such as those based on race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, national origin ancestry,
age or physical handicap. This commitment remains consonant with the obligation to protect open and wide ranging public discourse. The principle of freedom of expression that might otherwise protect
even the most offensive public speech, does not protect, nor does it even encompass a right to threaten the dignity and
privacy of an individual. Such personally directed behavior will not be tolerated. It is antithetical to academic values, debilitates its victims,
compromises the offenders and undermines the university’s
fundamental commitment to individual freedom and
respect for all its members. Furthermore, acts of
intolerance may destroy the very atmosphere wherein
freedom of expression is otherwise tolerated and cherished. (audience applauding) – And with that, I
congratulate the class of 2023 and invite you all to a reception
here on the Harkness Lawn. Congratulations. (audience applauding)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *